Archive

Posts Tagged ‘awesome’

Antec Kühler H2O 950 Review

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review

Manufacturer: Antec
UK price (as reviewed):
£65.94
US price (as reviewed): $84.99

Of all the companies that have jumped on the all-in-one liquid cooler band wagon in the last few years, Corsair and Antec have usually been the ones to beat. Antec has ruled the roost for a while with its great software suite and awesome cooling and the Kühler H2O 920 held the top spot until Corsair’s Hydro H80i and SilverStone’s Tundra TD03 turned up.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
With the Kühler H20 920 now going end of life, its replacement, the Kühler H20 950 looks to fill its shoes. Like its predecessor, the Kühler H20 950 is a dual fan-wielding beast with a 50mm-thick radiator. However, where the Kühler H20 950 differs from pretty much any all-in-one that’s gone before it is the location of the pump. Instead of sitting on top of the waterblock, Antec has chosen to place the pump on top of the front fan bearing.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
It’s a slightly bizarre decision as the radiator is usually the one thing that you’ll have issues installing seeing as the waterblocks on all-in-one liquid coolers are usually so small. However, it shouldn’t make much difference to cooling seeing as the coolant temperature tends to equalise fairly quickly in most liquid cooling loops anyway. That said, there’s an awful lot of extra engineering that has to go into creating a radiator with two additional ports and four tubes so we’re glad to see the price remains competitive. In fact, the Kühler H20 950 is £5-10 cheaper than Corsair’s similar H80i.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
The front fan sports directional blades at the rear (a lot like those on SilverStone’s Air Penetrator fans), which Antec claims focus air through the radiator. The radiator itself has moderately dense fin packing and is clearly designed to work best with two fans in a push-pull setup. The rear fan is a standard 120mm type but if you’re partial to removing the stock fans and using your own premium models, this won’t be possible with the Kühler H20 950 as the front fan and pump are essentially a single-piece design.

With no pump in tow, the waterblock is exceptionally thin. However, this didn’t mean it was particularly easy to fit. Antec employs a rather fiddly mounting bracket to deal with both AMD and Intel sockets with a variety of sprung pins being used to secure it to the motherboard. However, securing these was easier said than done; we’re not usually inclined to deduct too many points here for the simple reason that you only fit your cooler once even in a span of several years. Needless to say, if you struggle for patience, Corsair’s current coolers are less inclined to have you in fits of rage.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
The centre of the waterblock illuminates depending on how toasty your CPU is. As with the Kühler H20 920, there’s a bundled application that allows you to set a user-defined, extreme or silent fan profile. Out of the box, we doubt anyone with a modern system won’t be able to use the Kühler H20 950 as its compatible with everything from LGA775 upwards on Intel motherboards plus AMD Socket AM2 upwards as well, including Socket FM2.

Specifications

  • Compatibility Intel: LGA775, LGA115x, LGA1366, LGA2011; AMD: AM3(+), AM2(+), FM2(+), FM1
  • Radiator size (mm) 120 x 159 x 50 (W x D x H)
  • Water block size (mm) approx. 70 x 70 x 26 (W x D x H)
  • Tubing length approx. 300mm
  • Fan(s) 2 x 120mm, 600-2,400RPM
  • Stated NoiseNot stated

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/HHxKQUzV3aE/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/A-DV9l4_ecQ/

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review

Manufacturer: Antec
UK price (as reviewed):
£65.94
US price (as reviewed): $84.99

Of all the companies that have jumped on the all-in-one liquid cooler band wagon in the last few years, Corsair and Antec have usually been the ones to beat. Antec has ruled the roost for a while with its great software suite and awesome cooling and the Kühler H2O 920 held the top spot until Corsair’s Hydro H80i and SilverStone’s Tundra TD03 turned up.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
With the Kühler H20 920 now going end of life, its replacement, the Kühler H20 950 looks to fill its shoes. Like its predecessor, the Kühler H20 950 is a dual fan-wielding beast with a 50mm-thick radiator. However, where the Kühler H20 950 differs from pretty much any all-in-one that’s gone before it is the location of the pump. Instead of sitting on top of the waterblock, Antec has chosen to place the pump on top of the front fan bearing.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
It’s a slightly bizarre decision as the radiator is usually the one thing that you’ll have issues installing seeing as the waterblocks on all-in-one liquid coolers are usually so small. However, it shouldn’t make much difference to cooling seeing as the coolant temperature tends to equalise fairly quickly in most liquid cooling loops anyway. That said, there’s an awful lot of extra engineering that has to go into creating a radiator with two additional ports and four tubes so we’re glad to see the price remains competitive. In fact, the Kühler H20 950 is £5-10 cheaper than Corsair’s similar H80i.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
The front fan sports directional blades at the rear (a lot like those on SilverStone’s Air Penetrator fans), which Antec claims focus air through the radiator. The radiator itself has moderately dense fin packing and is clearly designed to work best with two fans in a push-pull setup. The rear fan is a standard 120mm type but if you’re partial to removing the stock fans and using your own premium models, this won’t be possible with the Kühler H20 950 as the front fan and pump are essentially a single-piece design.

With no pump in tow, the waterblock is exceptionally thin. However, this didn’t mean it was particularly easy to fit. Antec employs a rather fiddly mounting bracket to deal with both AMD and Intel sockets with a variety of sprung pins being used to secure it to the motherboard. However, securing these was easier said than done; we’re not usually inclined to deduct too many points here for the simple reason that you only fit your cooler once even in a span of several years. Needless to say, if you struggle for patience, Corsair’s current coolers are less inclined to have you in fits of rage.

Antec Kühler H20 950 Review Antec Kühler H20 950 Review
The centre of the waterblock illuminates depending on how toasty your CPU is. As with the Kühler H20 920, there’s a bundled application that allows you to set a user-defined, extreme or silent fan profile. Out of the box, we doubt anyone with a modern system won’t be able to use the Kühler H20 950 as its compatible with everything from LGA775 upwards on Intel motherboards plus AMD Socket AM2 upwards as well, including Socket FM2.

Specifications

  • Compatibility Intel: LGA775, LGA115x, LGA1366, LGA2011; AMD: AM3(+), AM2(+), FM2(+), FM1
  • Radiator size (mm) 120 x 159 x 50 (W x D x H)
  • Water block size (mm) approx. 70 x 70 x 26 (W x D x H)
  • Tubing length approx. 300mm
  • Fan(s) 2 x 120mm, 600-2,400RPM
  • Stated NoiseNot stated

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/HHxKQUzV3aE/1

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/0Ng6dy51CuU/

Mod of the Month March 2014

Mod of the Month March 2014

We’re finally getting some decent weather here in the UK after a pretty appalling winter so those of us that have been flooded, frozen in or just plain don’t like tinkering out in the shed when it’s a bit nippy, are gearing up for a spring and summer full of modding. There’s already been plenty of action in our modding forum this month too. Several projects have been completed, as you can see in our monthly Modding Update, and there are some fantastic in-progress projects in the works too.

We’ve picked six of our favourites this month, which we’ve highlighted over the next few pages and you can vote for the ones that catch your eye too. Head over to our modding section and modding and project log forums to see more – there are plenty of amazing projects to see and guides to follow. We’ve also got our Case Mod Index and Scratchbuild Index too – you can see what other people have done modding-wise with particular cases or build materials and we give a prize to one lucky entrant each month.

Mod of the month is proudly sponsored by Mnpctech. The Mnpctech guys are regulars on our forums and, in addition to being avid modders themselves with some awesome projects to their names, the Mnpctech online store is also well worth a visit from every modder.

Mod of the Month March 2014
The winner of Mod of the Month will get one of these awesome prizes from the Mnpctech store itself. There will be some new and exciting products from Mnpctech on the horizon too, but for now feast your eyes on these pieces of true PC bling.


Mod of the Month March 2014

Prize 1 – Pair of 120mm RED Sharkoon Shark Blade Silent Cooling Fans

Sharkoon SHARK Blade fans are equipped with a fluid bearing for long life and ultra-smooth operation. The special 3D curved design with striped air guides steers the airflow straight through the fan blades, thus preventing air turbulence – the main cause of wind noise. Fan speed: 1000 rpm, Start voltage: 7 V (DC), Max. airflow: ~56m³/h (33 CFM), Max air pressure: 2.63 mm-H2O, Noise level: 19 dB (A)


Mod of the Month March 2014

Prize 2 – Mnpctech Screw’d M3 PC Radiator Screws

“M3 Radiator Screw’d” fasteners have anodized rings to dress up radiator grills or match your custom PC accessories or liquid cooling components. They work with the following PC Radiator Manufacturers with M3 threads.
*Winner has choice of 3 sets of same color and size (12 total)

Mod of the Month March 2014

Prize 3 – Pair of Modder’s Work Gloves

These work gloves are made from combination of syntrex leather and spandex for dexterity. Recommended for use with power or hand tools or bending Acrylic or PETG tubing with heat gun.

Thanks to Mnpctech for stumping up such fantastic prizes again this month. We’ve got six very promising projects for you again, so it’s time to vote for your favourites. Don’t forget that you can vote for more than one project if you’re finding it tough to choose one over the others. MOTM is a competition for in-progress projects. You should consider potential, originality, execution and show of skill when voting.

This Month’s Contenders

  • Minecraft Creeper MbKr by kier
  • Minions Mod by Ronnie Hara
  • Project KUBUS by XTSX
  • R.O.G Reactor by Zsolt Guriga
  • The G5-yufi by thegyufi
  • ZdMods – Project 720 by Meelobee

Mod of the Month March 2014 Mod of the Month March 2014
Mod of the Month March 2014 Mod of the Month March 2014 Mod of the Month March 2014 Mod of the Month March 2014

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/modding/~3/W3jfeGVRzhM/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/s5Tz2GMrUwg/

Antoine Leblond leaves Microsoft

Antoine Leblond leaves Microsoft

Microsoft veteran Antoine Leblond is to leave the company after almost 25 years, an apparent victim of recent executive shake-ups.


Microsoft’s Antoine Leblond has told colleagues he is leaving the company as of today, after almost 25 years in the company’s Office and Windows divisions.

Leblond started his career at Microsoft working on the company’s best-selling Office productivity suite alongside Steven Sinofsky. When Sinofsky shifted across to head the Windows division, Leblond followed and become heavily involved in the development of the cloud storage portion of the company’s Windows 8 operating system as well as speaking publicly regarding its exclusive DirectX features.

When Sinofsky left the company in November 2012 following the poor reception of Windows 8, the future looked unclear for Leblond. When no expanded role was provided as part of Ballmer’s July 2013 shake-up, Leblond’s days looked numbered; a fact seemingly confirmed when incoming chief executive Satya Nadella announced his own reorganisation earlier this month, again with no mention of Leblond.

After almost 25 years, I’ve decided it’s time for me to go out and see what the non-Microsoft world has to offer,‘ claimed Leblond, in an email to colleagues obtained by Re/code. ‘Every single day I have had here has been amazing in its own way, and I will never look back on all of these years with anything but fondness, pride in what we’ve accomplished together, and a real appreciation for having been lucky enough to be part of so many awesome things. I am sad to leave all of you, but also incredibly excited for what comes next.

Today marks Leblond’s last day at Microsoft; the company has yet to issue an official statement regarding his departure.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/dja_HIVD7Vg/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/pu_Qje4rB-c/

Crave Ep. 152: App lets you make music with a full symphony

Subscribe to Crave:

iTunes (HD)iTunes (SD)iTunes (HQ)

RSS (HD)RSS (SD)RSS (HQ)

How fast can you solve a Rubik’s cube? Probably not as fast as the CubeStormer 3 Lego robot, which just set a new world record. We jam with Cadenza, an app out of Harvard that lets you play along with a full orchestra, and we get Superman’s POV using a drone, a green screen, and some really creative video. All that and more on this week’s Crave show.

Crave stories:

- Lego robot sets new Rubik’s Cube world record

- Cubli cube robot demonstrates incredible balance

- Tidy Dog: Smart toy bin trains pups to pick up

- Prepare Barbie for battle with 3D-printed armor

- Instrument reads tattoos as sheet music

- Cadenza: You play, and a full orchestra plays with you

- Superman + drone + GoPro = awesome POV footage

Social networking:

- Stephen on Twitter

- Stephen on Google+

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/KqO_PsPphFo/

Superman + drone + GoPro = awesome POV footage

Superman with a GoPro

Superman checks himself out in a mirror.


(Credit:
Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET)

While we’re all waiting around for Superman to hook up with Batman in 2016, we’ll have to get our Man of Steel fix elsewhere. So let’s saunter over to YouTube and join a couple million other people in watching a low-budget Superman POV adventure cleverly filmed with a drone and a GoPro.

The video features a guy in a classic spandex Superman outfit, complete with tightie reddies, flying through a city to return a lost GoPro camera to its owner. Naturally, it’s not that simple. There are bad guys with guns, a cop who is also a fan, a building on fire, and a thrilling mid-air rescue of a damsel in distress.

The footage comes from Internet video creators Corridor Digital. The makers call it one of the most challenging projects they’ve attempted.

A behind-the-scenes video lets viewers in on the secrets behind the Superman production. The flight scenes were captured using a $679 Dji Phantom 2 quadrocopter. The GoPro sits under it on a stabilizing mount to keep the footage smooth. The result is some pretty exhilarating video, especially if you open it up to full-screen and pretend you’re flying along for the ride.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/DpmpZEib60A/

Quadcopter captures footage of active volcano

volcano
(Credit:
Video screenshot by Michelle Starr/CNET Australia)

Active volcanoes, for obvious reasons, are hard to study up close. They’re dangerous to human-piloted aircraft — as well as human bodies — which means footage of active craters is difficult to obtain.

YouTuber Shaun O’Callaghan, however, figured out a way: with a quadcopter. He attached a GoPro action camera to a DJI Phantom and flew that baby right into the crater of Mount Yasur, an active volcano on Tanna Island, Vanuatu.

Amazingly, the drone escaped unscathed — even getting up close and personal with lava that can reach temperatures up to 1,200 degrees Celsius — and O’Callaghan successfully demonstrated that volcanoes are awesome.

Also how effectively quadcopters can be used for research where humans can’t go. But we’d like to think it’s at least equal parts awesome.

Check it out for yourself in the video below.

(Source: Crave Australia via Dronehire.org)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/nfnvyawK2_4/

Mobile March Madness tips for staying in the game

March Madness Live

The welcome screen for March Madness Live.


(Credit:
Screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET)

You’ve got March Madness fever, and the only solution is more cowbell. Scratch that. The only solution is to harness the awesome power of mobile technology and turn your smartphone and tablet into your personal ball boy.

Whether you’re a seasoned pro or someone who fills out your bracket based on which mascot is most likely to eat the other, you can rely on your mobile device to provide non-stop tournament coverage. You can also rely on it to be the most discrete way to watch games, check your bracket, and see what social media has to say while you’re stuck at work.

Make it official
Let’s start with the source, the one app to rule them all: the official NCAA March Madness Live. The free app is back, along with some updates over last year’s model. The tournament bracket has been redesigned with a handy pinch-to-zoom interface, there’s an integrated news section, and an even stronger focus on social-media updates.

All of the games are available as live streams through the app, but there are some restrictions. Any game due to broadcast over the air on CBS is open to anyone to watch. (Disclosure: CBS is the parent company of CNET.) Games that are scheduled for cable, however, require proof of a paid TV subscription. There is one way to skim around this (sort of). The app gives you a three-hour grace period to watch games before you have to log in, so choose wisely, grasshopper.


ESPN Tournament Challenge

Face off against celebrities with the ESPN app. (Click to enlarge.)


(Credit:
Screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET)

Post-Selection Sunday
You survived the insanity of Selection Sunday; that means you’ve been dreaming in brackets and agonizing over your Final Four. You can’t stand to be away from your bracket for more than a few minutes, so be sure you have a bracket app on your mobile device. Naturally, March Madness Live has a bracket section, but it’s not your only option.

The free ESPN Tournament Challenge app for
Android or iOS looks pretty slick and lets you build a bracket group with your buddies, all pretty standard fare. To sweeten the pot, it also lets you compete against celebrity brackets. Last year’s celebrities included the likes of Will Smith, Takeo Spikes, and Common. It’s a bit like TMZ meets March Madness.

Only the thrillers
With 68 teams scheduled to play throughout the tournament, you’re going to have to make some decisions about which games to watch. You could pore over the schedule, or you could just sit back and let the Thuuz app tell you what’s worth watching. The free app gives out game ratings on a scale of 1-100. A score of 85 or up means it’s a great game. This is updated live, so you can get alerts of impending bracket busters or overtimes. The excitement alert is particularly handy. When a game hits a certain “excitement threshold,” you get a notification so you can get your eyes on it in time to catch the best action. It sure beats watching the video replay later.

Sneak March Madness at work
You don’t have to be James Bond to discreetly sneak March Madness past the watchful eyes at work. If you already have your phone cued up, it’s simple enough to steal a glance at a game or check the score under your desk. Are we encouraging this sort of behavior? No, but if you’re going to it anyway, you might as well get away with it. Here are a few ways to get a more complete experience without taking a sick day:

Grab an earful
Local radio stations usually carry the tournament games, so break out your earphones and download the TuneIn app to get access to 100,00 live radio stations. You’ll get the play-by-play in a format designed for listening, so there’s no awkwardness around holding a phone or
tablet on your lap that makes your co-workers wonder why you’re constantly looking down at your crotch.

Put up a privacy screen
If you prefer to leave your tablet or smartphone on your desk with impunity, then at least try to hide it with a privacy screen protector. These sheets fit over the display and make it so only people looking head-on can see what’s shaking on the device. Anybody looking at it from the side will just see a dark screen, which might raise questions about why you’re standing up and yelling at your blank
iPad. Just try to keep yourself under control.

Get creative
Last year, a clever college-basketball fan hacked a simple notepad, carving out a niche for his phone to sit. It looked like he was studiously taking notes, but he was actually watching the games stream live. This would work equally well in either a work or school environment.

Whatever method you choose to stay jacked into the tournament, just try not to let your productivity slump too much. You don’t want to give yourself away. Have a marvelous mobile March Madness, folks.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/CZQPJay9dNU/

The Web at 25: How it won the White House — and won me back

On assignment.


(Credit:
Johanna DeBiase)

This week I’ve been celebrating 25 years of the Web by retracing my own life, lived largely online, from the Web’s early years to the dot-com boom and bust to the slow emergence of Web 2.0, which I largely missed while in self-imposed digital exile in Alaska. In the final installment today I look at how I came back to the Web just in time for things to get really good.

Look through my author’s profile here at CNET and you might notice that I’m a bit obsessed with following the latest developments in the mobile world, from even the most hopeful iPhone rumors to torture-testing ruggedized Android phones. But back in January of 2007 when the first iPhone was introduced, arguably kicking off the global smartphone craze and eventually helping to push the mobile Web into the mainstream, I missed it completely.

I was focused on being a new father at the time, and although I was back living in the contiguous United States after a stint in a fly-in village in the Alaskan bush where even landline calls came with a 3-second satellite delay, I still had not yet fully re-immersed myself in digital life.

The events of the prior seven years — from being part of the dot-com bust to witnessing firsthand the impacts of climate change in Alaska and touring the mind-boggling nation that is modern China — had all led me to believe that my skills as a journalist might be better used covering issues like energy, the environment, and the politics that drive these for a national radio audience rather than tracking every movement of the hottest startups.

My time in the wilderness had turned me from the hardest-core digital devotee into someone more like my grandmother, a remarkably well-informed octogenarian who has still never touched a keyboard to this day, at least to my knowledge.

But here’s one of the secrets to life that I finally learned the day my now-6-year-old daughter was born: time is our only truly finite resource (although Google and people like Ray Kurzweil seem to be working to change that). Yes, I know it sounds like a ridiculous headline from Thought Catalog, but when faced with the desire to use my time more efficiently so I could spend more of it with my new family, the prospect of reporting on our highly repetitive and inefficient political processes began to feel increasingly corrosive for my soul.

Don’t get me wrong, we could probably use more people scouring the political beat, but it was during the presidential campaign in 2008 that I began to realize I was just over it. Ironically, after covering politics helped draw me away from a career on the Web, it was the unprecedented use of the Web — particularly the social Web — during that campaign that drew me back online.

Tumblr-dry my soul
It wasn’t until August 2008 that Facebook reached 100 million global users (yes, just one-twelfth of its current user count), and the Obama campaign in particular bombarded many of those users with advertising on the social network that encouraged more than 3 million to sign up as supporters of the candidate on Facebook. On election day, 5.4 million people clicked the “I Voted” button on Facebook’s Election ’08 page.

Using this social presence, combined with the campaign’s own social network and an aggressive email and texting campaign, Obama raised half a billion dollars for the campaign on the Web alone. By comparison, the amount of contributions to all candidates from all sources in the 2004 campaign was just $880 million, according to figures from the Federal Election Commission. Arguably, the Web had won the White House for the first time ever.

In 25 years the Web has gone from being ignored to practically winning the White House.


(Credit:

PresidentObama
)

Blogs also played an unprecedented role in that campaign, both the influential partisan sites like DailyKos and HotAir, and official blogs of the candidates that encouraged participation and posting by supporters. I had kept an eye on the blogosphere over the years, even from rural Alaska, and became completely enamored with Tumblr in early 2008, finding it to be a perfect tool to let off steam with a bit of outright mockery of the political system I was becoming increasingly frustrated with covering.

After a six-year absence, I had created yet another in a long line of half-assed Web sites to my name to share my disorganized thoughts with the world. I was back, baby!

My Tumblr was tiny but grew surprisingly quickly by satirizing the hot political stories of the day, and helped bring me fully back to working on the Web with a gig as an editor at AOL in 2009. Something about working for the company that first introduced me to the Web in the mid-’90s and even helped me score my first kiss had the poetic feel of an Elton John song. But as it turns out, the AOL of this century is much different than the one that nurtured me in my youth and I only lasted there for about nine months. But no biggie, as the folks I met through AOL were and continue to be awesome, and it eventually led me here to Crave, where once again, after a nearly decade-long hiatus, I finally felt at home on the Web again.

So that’s my story of love, loss, exile, and homecoming on the Web, spanning almost its entire 25-year history — from an awkward adolescence through the bubble that burst in our faces to the epic quest for meaning amid the chaos of worlds both physical and digital that leads us to today, and a mature Web that isn’t quite perfect, but is pretty damn cool.

#HappyBirthdayAndManyMore


(Credit:
Johanna DeBiase)

But in wrapping this up it also seems only natural to ask what’s next for the Web. I don’t actually think my opinion on that is particularly valuable, but fortunately we did ask the guy who dreamed the whole thing up 25 years ago.

What does strike me, though, is that my first exposure to a computer came at age 8, to online services about four years later, and finally to the Web at age 15. Almost two decades after that, it is the central interface for my life, following important daily face-to-face time with the two redheads I share an abode with, of course.

The smallest of those redheads, my daughter, could perform basic operations on a
tablet at age 2, followed a few years later by surfing certain Web sites on a Netbook. Today she already does homework and pretty major science and craft projects on the Web. By the time she’s my age, with the growth of the Internet of Things and of her digital skills, I have to wonder if she might really be living life on the Web, in a more literal way.

I just hope she takes time out to see the Arctic along the way — the Northern Lights are way more spectacular in person than on YouTube.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/lCo3EGtTa78/

Craig Ferguson ‘f-ing’ loves science with new TV show

CBS Late Late Show host Craig Ferguson to executive produce new TV show all about the lighter side of science. No word on robot sidekick, Geoff Peterson, cameos.

CBS “Late Late Show” host Craig Ferguson will produce a new TV show all about the lighter side of science. No word on a robot sidekick, Geoff Peterson, or cameos.


(Credit:
CBS)

Science shows don’t have to be all academics and no fun. This past weekend at
South by Southwest, comedian and late-night TV host Craig Ferguson announced plans to produce a new show based on the popular blog I F-ing Love Science.

According to the “I F-ing Love Science” Facebook page, “We’re here for the science — the funny side of science. Quotes, jokes, memes, and anything your admin finds awesome and strange. If you take yourself seriously, you’re on the wrong page. We’re dedicated to bringing the amazing world of science straight to your newsfeed in an amusing and accessible way. Tell us what makes you say ‘wow!’”

Elise Andrew, the blog founder and Facebook moderator, is also employed by LabX Media Group, which also owns LabWrench, as well as publishes Lab Manager Magazine and The Scientist.

“If you know anything about me, you know I love science,” Ferguson said in his announcement via their blog. “Science has a naughty secret — it’s that all things are connected. And this show is going to explore the randomness of science. Think of it as a late night Google search that goes a hundred pages deep until things get weird — and then you just keep going. And there is no better partner for this kind of smart entertainment like Science Channel and Elise.”

The show will debut this summer and will run an hour long. Andrew will guide the show with Ferguson as a consulting producer and will contribute to the editorial voice of the show.

“In just two short years, we’ve amassed a following of ten million people,” Andrew posted on her science blog. “Via social media alone, we reach fifty million people a week. With this new venture, we’ll be able to reach million of new people and show them exactly why science is so damn exciting.”

I F-ing Love Science isnt the first blog to get its own TV show, but it could be the most informative.

“I F-ing Love Science” isn’t the first blog to get its own TV show, but it could be the most informative.


(Credit:
Elise Andrew)


(Via Huffington Post)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/Nt1NclHqZbU/