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Posts Tagged ‘korea’

Salvador Dali’s elephants get the steampunk Lego treatment

Jin Keis elephant Lego creation

It’s a Lego elephant on stilts.


(Credit:
Jin Kei)

Korean Lego artist Jin Kei looked at Salvador Dali’s surrealist masterpiece “The Elephants” and imagined it in plastic brick form. Then, he went even further, and translated it through the lens of steampunk. The result is an embodiment of the toothpick-legged elephant from the painting, except it is full of complex gears and mechanical joints that capture both aesthetics perfectly.

The most prominent feature of Dali’s work is the elephants’ impossibly tiny legs that look more like an insect’s than a pachyderm’s. The Lego version re-creates these, but with what look like hydraulic joints. The fun really starts when you dive into the details of the build, from the hatch wheel on the elephant’s side to the oil-derrick-like top piece.

If you look closely, there’s even a puff of Lego smoke coming out near the back. This creature would fit right in with the steam-powered machines of “Wild Wild West.” All of the gears and mechanical bits make it look considerably more plausible than the near-alien creations Dali imagined.

Kei’s creation stands an impressive 32 inches tall. There are two of the elephants in the painting, so you’ll have to use your imagination to double up the Lego versions. This isn’t Kei’s first foray into steampunk Lego builds. He previously tackled a steampunk version of Batman’s movie motorcycle. The elephant, however, is a true stunner as both an homage to Dali and a master class in imaginative Lego construction.

Dali elephant in Lego

Jin Kei’s surreal elephant runs on steam.


(Credit:
Jin Kei)

(Via The Brothers Brick)

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Preserved woolly-mammoth autopsy shows cloning is a real possibility

Woolly mammoth
(Credit:

Woolly mammoth image by Flying Puffin, CC BY-SA 2.0
)

The female woolly mammoth unearthed in the Lyakhovsky Islands in May 2013 could one day become the “mother” of the first woolly mammoth to walk the earth in millennia.

The discovery of the beast caused excitement when the scientists who unearthed her found that she was very well preserved — to the point that her blood was still liquid after all these years.

Now, after a necropsy (an autopsy on an animal), the team has discovered that the mammoth’s soft tissues are in excellent condition, so much so that they may be able to extract enough high-quality DNA to perform an analysis — and maybe even a reconstruction.

“We have dissected the soft tissues of the mammoth — and I must say that we didn’t expect such results. The carcass that is more than 43,000 years old has preserved better than a body of a human buried for six months,” Viktoria Egorova, chief of the Research and Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory of the Medical Clinic of North-Eastern Federal University, Siberia, told the Siberian Times. “The tissue cut clearly shows blood vessels with strong walls. Inside the vessels there is haemolysed blood, where for the first time we have found erythrocytes. Muscle and adipose tissues are well preserved.”

The team also found migrating lymphoid tissue cells; the liver, intact, with hard fragments inside, possibly kidney stones; and the animal’s intestines, with the remains of the vegetation it consumed prior to dying still inside. The analysis of the blood, interestingly, revealed some insight into how the mammoth died: the blood was “agonized,” indicating that the animal had died an unnatural death, in pain for 16 to 18 hours. The unnatural angle of the leg leads scientists to believe the mammoth fell into an ice hole and couldn’t get out.

Cloning is something the scientists are considering — but first they have to determine if the DNA is usable for this purpose, including something called a “living cell” — the least damaged DNA; and then, of course, there’s the tricky matter of gestation.

“The next question is how to use an elephant in the cloning process,” Semyon Grigoriev, the leader of the expedition that found the mammoth, explained. “The evolutionary path of the mammoth and the elephant diverged a long time ago. So even if we could get a ‘living cell’ we need to have a special method of cloning. The Koreans are working on getting the clones from different species, but, you see, it is not so fast. If we do not get ‘living cell,’ we will have a longer route. Then we should create artificial DNA; it could take 50 or 60 years.”

And then there are the moral concerns around cloning extinct animals. Some scientists believe that such an act would be irresponsible. First of all, you have to determine how and why an animal became extinct. Then you have to examine the impact of the animal’s return on the current environment. And then you have to think about how it would affect the animal itself. Elephants, for example, are herd animals; how would the world’s only mammoth cope?

As Vice President of the Russian Association of Medical Anthropologists Radik Khayrullin said, “We must have a reason to do this, as it is one thing to clone it for scientific purposes, and another to clone for the sake of curiosity.”

But, even without cloning, the mammoth is a rich source of information to the scientists.

“Apart from cloning, these samples will give us an opportunity to completely decode the DNA of the mammoth, and we will be able to decipher the nuclear DNA, which stores a lot of information,” Grigoriev said. “So we have a unique opportunity to understand how the mammoth’s blood system worked, its muscles and the trunk. Of course, we are engaged primarily in fundamental science. It is important to us to learn all possible details about mammoth. Maybe our findings will be used by applied science, but now it is early to think of it.”

The team will present its findings at a special conference to be held in May. Meanwhile, you can see images of the necropsy on the Siberian Times Web site.

(Source: Crave Australia via The Siberian Times)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/shFLhvKaIYA/

Preserved woolly mammoth autopsy shows cloning is a real possibility

Woolly mammoth
(Credit:

Woolly mammoth image by Flying Puffin, CC BY-SA 2.0
)

The female woolly mammoth unearthed in the Lyakhovsky Islands in May 2013 could one day become the “mother” of the first woolly mammoth to walk the earth in millennia.

The discovery of the beast caused excitement when the scientists who unearthed her found that she was very well preserved — to the point that her blood was still liquid after all these years.

Now, after an autopsy, the team has discovered that the mammoth’s soft tissues are in excellent condition, so much so that they may be able to extract enough high-quality DNA to perform an analysis — and maybe even a reconstruction.

“We have dissected the soft tissues of the mammoth — and I must say that we didn’t expect such results. The carcass that is more than 43,000 years old has preserved better than a body of a human buried for six months,” Viktoria Egorova, chief of the Research and Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory of the Medical Clinic of North-Eastern Federal University, Siberia, told the Siberian Times. “The tissue cut clearly shows blood vessels with strong walls. Inside the vessels there is haemolysed blood, where for the first time we have found erythrocytes. Muscle and adipose tissues are well preserved.”

The team also found migrating lymphoid tissue cells; the liver, intact, with hard fragments inside, possibly kidney stones; and the animal’s intestines, with the remains of the vegetation it consumed prior to dying still inside. The analysis of the blood, interestingly, revealed some insight into how the mammoth died: the blood was “agonized,” indicating that the animal had died an unnatural death, in pain for 16 to 18 hours. The unnatural angle of the leg leads scientists to believe the mammoth fell into an ice hole and couldn’t get out.

Cloning is something the scientists are considering — but first they have to determine if the DNA is usable for this purpose, including something called a “living cell” — the least damaged DNA; and then, of course, there’s the tricky matter of gestation.

“The next question is how to use an elephant in the cloning process,” Semyon Grigoriev, the leader of the expedition that found the mammoth, explained. “The evolutionary path of the mammoth and the elephant diverged a long time ago. So even if we could get a ‘living cell’ we need to have a special method of cloning. The Koreans are working on getting the clones from different species, but, you see, it is not so fast. If we do not get ‘living cell,’ we will have a longer route. Then we should create artificial DNA; it could take 50 or 60 years.”

And then there are the moral concerns around cloning extinct animals. Some scientists believe that such an act would be irresponsible. First of all, you have to determine how and why an animal became extinct. Then you have to examine the impact of the animal’s return on the current environment. And then you have to think about how it would affect the animal itself. Elephants, for example, are herd animals; how would the world’s only mammoth cope?

As Vice President of the Russian Association of Medical Anthropologists Radik Khayrullin said, “We must have a reason to do this, as it is one thing to clone it for scientific purposes, and another to clone for the sake of curiosity.”

But, even without cloning, the mammoth is a rich source of information to the scientists.

“Apart from cloning, these samples will give us an opportunity to completely decode the DNA of the mammoth, and we will be able to decipher the nuclear DNA, which stores a lot of information,” Grigoriev said. “So we have a unique opportunity to understand how the mammoth’s blood system worked, its muscles and the trunk. Of course, we are engaged primarily in fundamental science. It is important to us to learn all possible details about mammoth. Maybe our findings will be used by applied science, but now it is early to think of it.”

The team will present its findings at a special conference to be held in May. Meanwhile, you can see images of the autopsy on the Siberian Times Web site.

(Source: Crave Australia via The Siberian Times)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/shFLhvKaIYA/

Jony Ive: Competitors steal Apple’s work

Pursued by thieves?


(Credit:
Charlie Rose/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

Here is the good news: you can make Jony Ive angry. All you have to do it copy his ideas.

How do I know? Because I’ve just read a long interview with him in the UK’s Sunday Times. (It’s behind a paywall, but I promise I didn’t steal it.)

This interview was part of the Sunday Times Magazine’s “Makers” series, and Ive warmed immediately to the concept. “Everyone I work with shares the same love of and respect for making,” he explained.

He added: “Objects and their manufacture are inseparable. You understand a product if you understand how it’s made.”

The problem is that the word “maker” has been co-opted, nay stolen, by the pimple-faced, soft-hearted techies of San Francisco, who are deeply hurt to be called “techies.

Ive, though, believes craft is enjoying a resurgence. He said he once took his iPhone apart and put it back together again, just to prove he could.

Interestingly, the Sunday Times managed to dig up a photo to prove that he once had hair. And lots of it — spiky like a Bay City Roller. (Look it up.)

The interview takes great pains to describe the great pains Ive takes to make sure the products aren’t great pains. This is relatively familiar territory.

But Ive shone a little light into why Apple doesn’t exactly make cheap products.

He said:

We’re surrounded by anonymous, poorly made objects. It’s tempting to think it’s because the people who use them don’t care — just like the people who make them. But what we’ve shown is that people do care. It’s not just about aesthetics. They care about things that are thoughtfully conceived and well made.

The implication, of course, is that they’re prepared to pay for that thoughtfulness.

Ive put it like this: “We make and sell a very, very large number of (hopefully) beautiful, well-made things. Our success is a victory for purity, integrity — for giving a damn.”

He believes his job is making technology personal and he believes that the relationship people have with Apple products is intimate. (Oh, of course, he vaguely, slightly hinted at an intimate iWatch. But he wasn’t going to actually say anything, was he?)

Asked whether all the lining up outside Apple stores to wait for the latest thing isn’t intimately insane, he replied: “It’s a demonstration against thoughtlessness and carelessness.”

I bet you’ve never thought of it that way. You always thought it was just a bunch of style-obsessed, superficial groupies who are vacuous in the extreme. (At least Samsung thinks so.)

Talking of Samsung — which Ive specifically did not — there is talk (and legal action) suggesting the Korean company (and others) occasionally mimics the work of Ive and his team.

Copying clearly annoys him. “It’s theft,” he said.

He added: “What’s copied isn’t just a design, it’s thousands and thousands of hours of struggle.”

Quiet struggle, though. Ive described a “pre-verbal” understanding at Apple about what everyone is trying to achieve.

Apple only gets verbal during the fancy presentations. And when it sues you, of course.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/Hl8enAdvvzA/

15 space organizations join hunt for missing Malaysian jet

An Indonesian Air Force military surveillance aircraft searches the Malacca Strait for Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.


(Credit:
Indonesian Air)

As the latest piece of technology to be enlisted in the search for missing Malaysian flight MH370, satellites have the eyes of the world watching them as they watch us.

On Monday, a crowdsourcing platform called Tomnod, along with parent company DigitalGlobe, launched a crowdsourcing campaign to enlist the help of citizens in scouring satellite images to search for the plane that disappeared on March 7.

China has followed that up by activating the International Charter on Space and Major Disasters to join the hunt on Tuesday. The goal of the charter is to enlist space data from 15 member organizations to provide assistance in the case of a “natural or technological disaster.” The charter describes such a disaster as “a situation of great distress involving loss of human life or large-scale damage to property, caused by a natural phenomenon, such as a cyclone, tornado, earthquake, volcanic eruption, flood or forest fire, or by a technological accident, such as pollution by hydrocarbons, toxic or radioactive substances.”

Now that the charter has been activated, space scientists around the planet will enlist the satellites available to them to gather images from the suspected area in which flight MH370 disappeared. The hope is that one of those images will pick up something that can direct search and recovery efforts.

Satellites are just one of the tech tools involved in the massive multi-national aircraft hunt that already includes the use of 42 sophisticated ships and 39 high-tech aircraft combing the waters according to the BBC. For example, listening devices are being lowered into the water to pick up the “ping” of the black box, and sophisticated MH60 Seahawk helicopters from the United States are employing Forward Looking Infra-red (FLIR) cameras that arm the searchers with night vision.

The International Charter on Space and Major Disasters was most recently activated on February 13 to help with monitoring the Mount Kelud volcano explosion on the Indonesian island of Java. Prior to that it’s been used to monitor flooding, forest fires, snowfalls, cyclones, oil spills and other damaging events around the world. It was also used to assist in recovery efforts from earthquakes, including the one that rocked Japan in March 2011 and caused a devastating tsunami and the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear plant. The charter has been activated 400 times in its history, but Tuesday represents the first time it was called into service to look for a missing aircraft. The only other transportation-related event for which it’s been used was to assist in gathering data after a train full of dynamite exploded in North Korea on April 23, 2004.

The charter, which began after Vienna’s Unispace III conference in 1999 with three agencies, has grown to its current membership of 15 organizations with the Russian Federal Space Agency being the most recent to join in 2013. Other member organizations include the European Space Agency, the Korea Aerospace Research Institute and China’s National Space Administration. The US member organizations include the United States Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After the charter has been activated, data typically starts coming in within 24 hours, according to a report in Phys.org.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/EZ4KCz25Huw/

Component shortages halt Oculus Rift production

February 24th, 2014 No comments

Component shortages halt Oculus Rift production

Production of the Oculus Rift Developer Kit hardware is being halted due to component shortages, with no timescale provided for its resumption.


Oculus Rift developer kits are likely to appreciate in value significantly in the coming months, as the company has warned that component shortages mean that production has been halted.

The crowdfunded virtual reality headset has enjoyed considerable success since it was first unveiled, using $75 million in private funding to produce an improved model dubbed Crystal Cove with better head tracking and a higher resolution. Crystal Cove isn’t commercially available, however, leaving users who want to get started early opting instead to buy the $400 Oculus Rift Developer Kit with its lower-resolution displays.

Those kits are going to be difficult to find, however, with the news that the company is halting production. ‘Certain components used in the Oculus Rift developer kit are no longer being manufactured, meaning they are no longer available to us for production,‘ the company told its customers in a status update. ‘As a result, we don’t have the necessary materials to produce additional kits. We still have some stock available, but we’re quickly running out. We are looking into alternate sources for the needed components, and we don’t yet have a timeline for when additional units will be available. We’ll be sure to keep everyone posted.

The shortage means that plans to offer the developer kits to further countries – beyond North America, the EU, Japan, South Korea, Australia, Switzerland and Norway – are being scrapped until additional components can be sourced. ‘We never expected to sell so many development kits and VR only made this much progress with the community’s support and enthusiasm,‘ the company added. ‘Even though we never wanted to sell out, it’s a good problem to have

The shortages will likely lead to a significant increase in the second-hand value of existing Oculus Rift Developer Kits.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/Gs1VAvlSUUU/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/OeY9O7NAl8I/

When can you actually get a Samsung Galaxy S5?

February 20th, 2014 No comments

When might you actually hold Samsung’s next superphone?


(Credit:
CBS Interactive)

We will finally see Samsung’s next big thing, the Galaxy S5, next Monday when it is revealed at a Samsung “Unpacked” event during Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, but when will the rest of us be able to finally get our hands on one?

Turns out the wait may be a little longer than you might hope.

A report on Thursday from GSMArena that has started to circulate quotes an anonymous Samsung executive “confirming” that the Galaxy S5 will go on sale in three weeks, or roughly mid-March, just a few weeks after its unveiling.

This seems optimistic given Samsung’s previous track record and also makes no specific mention of which markets or models the source might be referring to. Further, a report from ZDNet Korea quotes a parts supplier for Samsung that says it has not yet received an order from the company for Galaxy S5 components and speculates some last minute changes to some of the flagship phone’s peripherals might still be in the works.

The supplier speculates that the new handset will be commercially available at the end of March at the earliest. This also jives with another report about an advanced camera component in the Galaxy S5 that won’t enter into mass production until next month.

That’s all just a lot of insider supply chain chatter, but it serves as a reality check for actual normal human consumers like you and me. In other words, we should probably expect to wait at least a month between the time we first see the Galaxy S5 on Monday and the moment we can actually hold one in our hands.

The wait for the
Galaxy S4 after its big public debut in New York in mid-March 2013 also took several weeks — it didn’t begin to become available until the end of April in the United States.

If the Galaxy S5 turns out to be the powerhouse we’ve been told about, it may transform March 2014 into the great month of sitting on our hands in anticipation.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/zB84tu9ItFk/

Google Glass enthusiast: It’s not worth the headaches

February 13th, 2014 No comments

Barrett is in the middle. His Glass is in his hand.


(Credit:
Chris Barrett (with permission))

When the novelty wears off, do you stop wearing the novelty all together?

And what if the novelty is proving to be more of a pain than you ever imagined?

These seem to be the thoughts that have coursed through the head of Chris Barrett, who once prided himself on being a
Google Glass Explorer but now worries that it has affected his health.

Barrett is the PR man who was first to take Google Glass into a casino (and not get thumped by someone twice his size).

He also claimed to be the first to film an arrest with Google Glass, as well as getting Bon Jovi’s keyboard player to wear his Google Glass during a concert.

In tech, though, time is a very speedy and precarious concept. Though Barrett joined the Explorer Program in June 2013, he hasn’t worn his glasses for more than an hour in total since January 1.

There are two reasons. One is persistent headaches.

He told me:

The first headache came during the first week of wearing Glass. I was wearing Glass every day, all day long; I would wear it to Starbucks; I would wear it to the mall; I would wear it driving, and I would wear it at my office. There wasn’t a minute I didn’t have it on. By the second day wearing Glass, I was Googling everything I could, impressed with the novelty, demonstrating for friends, taking photos/videos. After a few hours of use, my head started to pound. I don’t usually get headaches. I thought maybe I was just tired, so I decided to sleep it off.

The second headache came about four to five weeks later, when he was being filmed by a Korean documentary film crew. They were shooting him and his fun wearing Google Glass. During this shoot, he says, he was wearing the glasses 8 hours a day.

The headache was far worse than the first time. He told me: “It hurt so badly that I had to go straight home and sleep.”

Barrett became convinced that prolonged Glass-wearing was causing him — someone with no previous pattern of headaches — to suffer.

He wondered, though, if he was alone. So he went to the private Google Glass community site to see whether anyone else had experienced difficulties.

There, he says, he found someone who, for example, had to keep his glasses high up on his nose to see the bottom of the display. This meant he had to look up very high, which he believes triggered headaches.

Others, Barrett says, acknowledged discomfort when having to look toward the right corner of Glass. One Explorer found that only his left eye experienced difficulties.

There are also some Explorers on Twitter who admit to discomfort.

Google is confident Glass doesn’t carry with it potential health hazards.

A company spokesperson told me: “Of course health and safety are extremely important to the Glass team, and we’ve been working with eye care professionals from the very beginning to ensure that the device is safe for use. In our help center, we do encourage new Explorers to ease into Glass, just as they would a new pair of glasses.”

Google also suggests that concerned Explorers contact its Glass team to see whether the glasses are fitting correctly.

It will be harder, however, for Google to address Barrett’s other concern with Glass. Having severely limited his usage, he’s finding that he neither misses the device, nor sees a compelling continued use for it.

He told me: “I have it on my desk every day, but I just don’t have a good enough reason to wear it. It’s not worth the headache. I get my e-mails on my laptop or iPhone if I’m on the go.”

There’s an old-fashioned approach to life for you.

It’s not even as if Barrett has been pulling out Glass much for special occasions. He admitted: “Since October, I’ve traveled around the world with Google Glass, from the Dublin Web Summit to LeWeb in Paris to Utah for the Sundance Film Festival. Glass was in my bag for each of these trips, and in my bag it stayed.”

This volte-face echoes that of renowned tech personality Robert Scoble, who once posed wearing Glass in the shower yet now believes it is “doomed,” at least for now.

Barrett actually wobbled in Utah, wondering if he should shoot some of the red carpet premieres with Google Glass. Instead: “I just used my Canon DSLR.”

His experience has persuaded him that Google Glass should include a health warning:

I think there should be a warning that comes with Glass; that if you start to get a headache, you should limit your use. Not everybody who wears Glass will make the connection, especially people who are prone to headaches. I can’t imagine the effect Glass could have on migraine suffers or those with other neurological conditions.

Barrett shouldn’t be mistaken for anything other than a Glass enthusiast (and talented publicist, of course). When he noticed that he was having trouble seeing the Glass graphics in sunny weather, he got together with the designers at Next Fab Studio to create the Google Glass 3D Printed Sunshade.

This had the fortunate (or not) side effect of masking the light that shows when the Glass camera is in use, which might help a Glass-wearer with a certain bent on exploration.

When it comes to his headaches, it’s instructive that Barrett doesn’t ache for a product whose existence he once so championed.

Where once he was desperate to get it into the hands of a New Jersey band, now he seems content that his head doesn’t hurt. He believes it caused excessive eyestrain and he has decided that “the easier solution at this point is to just not to wear them for extended periods of time.”

Once, he wore it well. Now he can hardly bear to wear it at all. That’s fashion for you.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/li_WIXleep8/

Google Glass evangelist: It’s not worth the headache

February 13th, 2014 No comments

Barrett is in the middle. His Glass is in his hand.


(Credit:
Chris Barrett (with permission))

When the novelty wears off, do you stop wearing the novelty all together?

And what if the novelty is proving to be more of a pain than you ever imagined?

These seem to be the thoughts that have coursed through the head of Chris Barrett, who once prided himself on being a
Google Glass Explorer but now worries that it has affected his health.

Barrett is the PR man who was first to take Google Glass into a casino (and not get thumped by someone twice his size).

He also claimed to be the first to film an arrest with Google Glass, as well as getting Bon Jovi’s keyboard player to wear his Google Glass during a concert.

In tech, though, time is a very speedy and precarious concept. Though Barrett joined the Explorer Program in June 2013, he hasn’t worn his glasses for more than an hour in total since January 1.

There are two reasons. One is persistent headaches.

He told me:

The first headache came during the first week of wearing Glass. I was wearing Glass every day, all day long; I would wear it to Starbucks; I would wear it to the mall; I would wear it driving, and I would wear it at my office. There wasn’t a minute I didn’t have it on. By the second day wearing Glass, I was Googling everything I could, impressed with the novelty, demonstrating for friends, taking photos/videos. After a few hours of use, my head started to pound. I don’t usually get headaches. I thought maybe I was just tired, so I decided to sleep it off.

The second headache came about four to five weeks later, when he was being filmed by a Korean documentary film crew. They were shooting him and his fun wearing Google Glass. During this shoot, he says, he was wearing the glasses 8 hours a day.

The headache was far worse than the first time. He told me: “It hurt so badly that I had to go straight home and sleep.”

Barrett became convinced that prolonged Glass-wearing was causing him — someone with no previous pattern of headaches — to suffer.

He wondered, though, if he was alone. So he went to the private Google Glass community site to see whether anyone else had experienced difficulties.

There, he says, he found someone who, for example, had to keep his glasses high up on his nose to see the bottom of the display. This meant he had to look up very high, which he believes triggered headaches.

Others, Barrett says, acknowledged discomfort when having to look toward the right corner of Glass. One Explorer found that only his left eye experienced difficulties.

There are also some Explorers on Twitter who admit to discomfort.

Google is confident Glass doesn’t carry with it potential health hazards.

A company spokesperson told me: “Of course health and safety are extremely important to the Glass team, and we’ve been working with eye care professionals from the very beginning to ensure that the device is safe for use. In our help center, we do encourage new Explorers to ease into Glass, just as they would a new pair of glasses.”

Google also suggests that concerned Explorers contact its Glass team to see whether the glasses are fitting correctly.

It will be harder, however, for Google to address Barrett’s other concern with Glass. Having severely limited his usage, he’s finding that he neither misses the device, nor sees a compelling continued use for it.

He told me: “I have it on my desk every day, but I just don’t have a good enough reason to wear it. It’s not worth the headache. I get my e-mails on my laptop or iPhone if I’m on the go.”

There’s an old-fashioned approach to life for you.

It’s not even as if Barrett has been pulling out Glass much for special occasions. He admitted: “Since October, I’ve traveled around the world with Google Glass, from the Dublin Web Summit to LeWeb in Paris to Utah for the Sundance Film Festival. Glass was in my bag for each of these trips, and in my bag it stayed.”

This volte-face echoes that of renowned tech personality Robert Scoble, who once posed wearing Glass in the shower yet now believes it is “doomed,” at least for now.

Barrett actually wobbled in Utah, wondering if he should shoot some of the red carpet premieres with Google Glass. Instead: “I just used my Canon DSLR.”

His experience has persuaded him that Google Glass should include a health warning:

I think there should be a warning that comes with Glass; that if you start to get a headache, you should limit your use. Not everybody who wears Glass will make the connection, especially people who are prone to headaches. I can’t imagine the effect Glass could have on migraine suffers or those with other neurological conditions.

Barrett shouldn’t be mistaken for anything other than a Glass enthusiast (and talented publicist, of course). When he noticed that he was having trouble seeing the Glass graphics in sunny weather, he got together with the designers at Next Fab Studio to create the Google Glass 3D Printed Sunshade.

This had the fortunate (or not) side effect of masking the light that shows when the Glass camera is in use, which might help a Glass-wearer with a certain bent on exploration.

When it comes to his headaches, it’s instructive that Barrett doesn’t ache for a product whose existence he once so championed.

Where once he was desperate to get it into the hands of a New Jersey band, now he seems content that his head doesn’t hurt. He believes it caused excessive eyestrain and he has decided that “the easier solution at this point is to just not to wear them for extended periods of time.”

Once, he wore it well. Now he can hardly bear to wear it at all. That’s fashion for you.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/9tVIXFDOQGU/

Galaxy S5 fans, here is why the S3 was more important (video)

February 10th, 2014 No comments

With invites for Samsung’s ‘Unpacked’ event sent out, we’re likely only a few weeks away from getting our first official look at Samsung’s long-awaited Galaxy S5. But Samsung wouldn’t have got this far without the Galaxy S3 — a true turning point for the South Korean tech giant. Press Play on the video above to see how Samsung’s third flagship turned the company from imitator to innovator.

Up close and personal with the Samsung Galaxy S3 (pictures)

The Galaxy S3 wasn’t just an amazing smartphone in its own right, it represented a change for Samsung, a moment where the company found its Galactic groove, and its own distinct style. Watch the video now to learn more.

In the past, Apple has accused Samsung of ‘slavishly’ copying its own designs, but this is the phone that saw Samsung emerge as Tim Cook and Co.’s only serious rival. We loved the mammoth list of wacky features, the shockingly powerful hardware, and the screen so massive it made the iPhone look like a tiny electronic ant.

In the latest Adventures in Tech you’ll learn how the Galaxy S3 saw Samsung find a voice, and gain its confidence — an audacity that’s shone clearly in all the phone maker’s subsequent gadgetry. Hit play now, for goodness’ sake!

Do you have fond memories of the Galaxy S3? Or do you prefer the diminutive, steely feeling of Apple’s iPhone? Watch the newest episode of Adventures in Tech, then let me know your thoughts in the comments, on our Facebook wall, or find me on Twitter.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/8USDzpIZL7M/