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9 extreme skiers of the future


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Is it a Jet Ski? Is it a surfboard? No, it's a one-man watercraft powered solely by the sun.Is it a Jet Ski? Is it a surfboard? No, it’s a one-man watercraft powered solely by the sun.

The brainchild of British designer Ross Kemp, ASAP was created as a greener and cheaper alternative to existing lifeguard rescue vehicles.The brainchild of British designer Ross Kemp, ASAP was created as a greener and cheaper alternative to existing lifeguard rescue vehicles.

ASAP's features include a sloping center platform to slide an injured swimmer onto and a catamaran-style hull to avoid slapping. A lighting system is under development so eventually ASAP will glow.ASAP’s features include a sloping center platform to slide an injured swimmer onto and a catamaran-style hull to avoid slapping. A lighting system is under development so eventually ASAP will glow.

Also in the running for the greenest ski machine around is the wind-powered Nereus concept by Mathias Koehler. Pivoting fins at the base allow you to steer it underwater too.Also in the running for the greenest ski machine around is the wind-powered Nereus concept by Mathias Koehler. Pivoting fins at the base allow you to steer it underwater too.

Could we be looking at a future of underwater highways? AQUA the personal submersible is an underwater car -- a one-man vessel for exploring the ocean.Could we be looking at a future of underwater highways? AQUA the personal submersible is an underwater car — a one-man vessel for exploring the ocean.

This futuristic ski machine is made out of carbon fiber and is also a friend of the environment -- it's powered by an electric water-jet propulsion system with a rechargeable battery.This futuristic ski machine is made out of carbon fiber and is also a friend of the environment — it’s powered by an electric water-jet propulsion system with a rechargeable battery.

Yes, it's another zero-emission skier! Green Samba is a lightweight vessel that will nip around the sea in near silence.Yes, it’s another zero-emission skier! Green Samba is a lightweight vessel that will nip around the sea in near silence.

This watercraft concept glides above the water's surface with two hydrofoils that act as wings, which allows it to go much faster than a traditional skiers.This watercraft concept glides above the water’s surface with two hydrofoils that act as wings, which allows it to go much faster than a traditional skiers.

The Jetlev Rescue Jet Pack is a rescue aid befit for a Hollywood film. High pressure water columns thrust the wearer into the air so you can fly over the water and reach areas inaccessible by lifeboat.
The Jetlev Rescue Jet Pack is a rescue aid befit for a Hollywood film. High pressure water columns thrust the wearer into the air so you can fly over the water and reach areas inaccessible by lifeboat.

Elevated by high-pressure water generated by a pump, the user steers with foot controls allowing the arms to be free on a rescue mission.Elevated by high-pressure water generated by a pump, the user steers with foot controls allowing the arms to be free on a rescue mission.

A similar concept but for leisure, Flyboarding allows you to soar through the skies like you're Iron Man. The device channels the water through a long hose that in turn connects to a pair of jet boots. A similar concept but for leisure, Flyboarding allows you to soar through the skies like you’re Iron Man. The device channels the water through a long hose that in turn connects to a pair of jet boots.


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(CNN) — Those souped-up water ski machines are ideal vacation-time fun but they’ve never been cheap.

Thanks to British designer Ross Kemp, the world has been graced with a solar-powered watercraft that costs just a third of the price of your average powered water craft.

Called ASAP, Kemp’s creation is part ski, part surfboard and part catamaran. Powered by the sun, it’s both free to run and fully sustainable.

Read more: the smart streetlamp that will save energy

Why ASAP?

ASAP stands for “As Soon As Possible,” reflecting the vessel’s intended function as a rescue craft. Kemp dreamed up the idea while on a lifeguard training course, where he spotted a gap in the market for a more effective and more affordable water rescue vehicle.

“While doing my training, I found it incredibly hard to tow a body in the water and started looking at rescue equipment. I saw an opportunity to design something from scratch,” says Kemp.

“A lot of rescue aids are simply re-purposed leisure equipment, for example a paddle board is just a surf board, and a Jet Ski is just adapted for rescue purposes, so rescuers adapt the way they rescue people to the equipment rather than the equipment for them.”

ASAP, however, has been designed with rescue missions in mind. Kemp spent months studying on-duty lifeguards to get an idea of how his concept could better assist the process.

In his final year as a design student at Loughborough University he developed the first ASAP prototype in a tent in his back garden.

Read more: The earthquake-proof table that offers reliable shelter


Inventors, innovators manipulate light


‘Earthquake table’ made to save lives


Refugee saves lives with mine detonator

So what makes it any good?

Whereas traditional skiers can be cumbersome to get going, ASAP is lightweight and can be jumped on and launched immediately by one person. It has a sloping center platform to slide the injured onto quickly, getting them buoyant as soon as possible and its V-shaped catamaran hull means it cuts through waves to avoid slapping, making it much safer for towing a casualty.

Kemp’s creation is timely. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) drowning is the third leading cause of accidental death around the world, yet with rising fuel prices petrol skiers are becoming an increasingly unfeasible option for local and charity run rescue stations.

At the moment ASAP can travel up to 15mph, but it’s still under development: “It’s not going to have the super power of a Jet Ski but it will certainly take the lifeguard to the casualty much quicker than swimming. We’re working on making the propulsion much stronger,” says Kemp.

CNN Blueprint set Kemp up with industrial design kingpin and mentor Ross Lovegrove, who loved the product but suggested he insert solar-powered lights so that ASAP glows as it goes.

Although only at its second prototype, ASAP has already won an award for Best Startup Business in the UK Lloyds TSB Enterprise Awards and Kemp is thinking about how to expand: “I’d love to be able to offer solar charging stations to local councils so they can charge their watercrafts whenever they need to.”

And the good news is that soon he hopes to introduce his solar-powered watercraft to the leisure market, which means we won’t need to undergo any grueling training or save any lives to give it a whirl.


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Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/08/06/tech/innovation/asap-solar-power-jet-ski/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/B17q2DpeNmI/9-extreme-skiers-of-the-future

9 extreme jet-skis of the future


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Is it a Jet Ski? Is it a surfboard? No, it's a one-man watercraft powered solely by the sun.Is it a Jet Ski? Is it a surfboard? No, it’s a one-man watercraft powered solely by the sun.

The brainchild of British designer Ross Kemp, ASAP was created as a greener and cheaper alternative to existing lifeguard rescue vehicles.The brainchild of British designer Ross Kemp, ASAP was created as a greener and cheaper alternative to existing lifeguard rescue vehicles.

ASAP's features include a sloping center platform to slide an injured swimmer onto and a catamaran-style hull to avoid slapping. A lighting system is under development so eventually ASAP will glow.ASAP’s features include a sloping center platform to slide an injured swimmer onto and a catamaran-style hull to avoid slapping. A lighting system is under development so eventually ASAP will glow.

Also in the running for the greenest ski machine around is the wind-powered Nereus concept by Mathias Koehler. Pivoting fins at the base allow you to steer it underwater too.Also in the running for the greenest ski machine around is the wind-powered Nereus concept by Mathias Koehler. Pivoting fins at the base allow you to steer it underwater too.

Could we be looking at a future of underwater highways? AQUA the personal submersible is an underwater car -- a one-man vessel for exploring the ocean.Could we be looking at a future of underwater highways? AQUA the personal submersible is an underwater car — a one-man vessel for exploring the ocean.

This futuristic ski machine is made out of carbon fiber and is also a friend of the environment -- it's powered by an electric water-jet propulsion system with a rechargeable battery.This futuristic ski machine is made out of carbon fiber and is also a friend of the environment — it’s powered by an electric water-jet propulsion system with a rechargeable battery.

Yes, it's another zero-emission skier! Green Samba is a lightweight vessel that will nip around the sea in near silence.Yes, it’s another zero-emission skier! Green Samba is a lightweight vessel that will nip around the sea in near silence.

This watercraft concept glides above the water's surface with two hydrofoils that act as wings, which allows it to go much faster than a traditional skiers.This watercraft concept glides above the water’s surface with two hydrofoils that act as wings, which allows it to go much faster than a traditional skiers.

The Jetlev Rescue Jet Pack is a rescue aid befit for a Hollywood film. High pressure water columns thrust the wearer into the air so you can fly over the water and reach areas inaccessible by lifeboat.
The Jetlev Rescue Jet Pack is a rescue aid befit for a Hollywood film. High pressure water columns thrust the wearer into the air so you can fly over the water and reach areas inaccessible by lifeboat.

Elevated by high-pressure water generated by a pump, the user steers with foot controls allowing the arms to be free on a rescue mission.Elevated by high-pressure water generated by a pump, the user steers with foot controls allowing the arms to be free on a rescue mission.

A similar concept but for leisure, Flyboarding allows you to soar through the skies like you're Iron Man. The device channels the water through a long hose that in turn connects to a pair of jet boots. A similar concept but for leisure, Flyboarding allows you to soar through the skies like you’re Iron Man. The device channels the water through a long hose that in turn connects to a pair of jet boots.


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(CNN) — Those souped-up water ski machines are ideal vacation-time fun but they’ve never been cheap.

Thanks to British designer Ross Kemp, the world has been graced with a solar-powered watercraft that costs just a third of the price of your average powered water craft.

Called ASAP, Kemp’s creation is part ski, part surfboard and part catamaran. Powered by the sun, it’s both free to run and fully sustainable.

Read more: the smart streetlamp that will save energy

Why ASAP?

ASAP stands for “As Soon As Possible,” reflecting the vessel’s intended function as a rescue craft. Kemp dreamed up the idea while on a lifeguard training course, where he spotted a gap in the market for a more effective and more affordable water rescue vehicle.

“While doing my training, I found it incredibly hard to tow a body in the water and started looking at rescue equipment. I saw an opportunity to design something from scratch,” says Kemp.

“A lot of rescue aids are simply re-purposed leisure equipment, for example a paddle board is just a surf board, and a Jet Ski is just adapted for rescue purposes, so rescuers adapt the way they rescue people to the equipment rather than the equipment for them.”

ASAP, however, has been designed with rescue missions in mind. Kemp spent months studying on-duty lifeguards to get an idea of how his concept could better assist the process.

In his final year as a design student at Loughborough University he developed the first ASAP prototype in a tent in his back garden.

Read more: The earthquake-proof table that offers reliable shelter


Inventors, innovators manipulate light


‘Earthquake table’ made to save lives


Refugee saves lives with mine detonator

So what makes it any good?

Whereas traditional skiers can be cumbersome to get going, ASAP is lightweight and can be jumped on and launched immediately by one person. It has a sloping center platform to slide the injured onto quickly, getting them buoyant as soon as possible and its V-shaped catamaran hull means it cuts through waves to avoid slapping, making it much safer for towing a casualty.

Kemp’s creation is timely. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) drowning is the third leading cause of accidental death around the world, yet with rising fuel prices petrol skiers are becoming an increasingly unfeasible option for local and charity run rescue stations.

At the moment ASAP can travel up to 15mph, but it’s still under development: “It’s not going to have the super power of a Jet Ski but it will certainly take the lifeguard to the casualty much quicker than swimming. We’re working on making the propulsion much stronger,” says Kemp.

CNN Blueprint set Kemp up with industrial design kingpin and mentor Ross Lovegrove, who loved the product but suggested he insert solar-powered lights so that ASAP glows as it goes.

Although only at its second prototype, ASAP has already won an award for Best Startup Business in the UK Lloyds TSB Enterprise Awards and Kemp is thinking about how to expand: “I’d love to be able to offer solar charging stations to local councils so they can charge their watercrafts whenever they need to.”

And the good news is that soon he hopes to introduce his solar-powered watercraft to the leisure market, which means we won’t need to undergo any grueling training or save any lives to give it a whirl.


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Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/08/06/tech/innovation/asap-solar-power-jet-ski/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/r2XYxuqwOTo/9-extreme-jet-skis-of-the-future

‘Space stations’ to transform Riyadh


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Construction of the Saudi Arabian capital's new metro system will begin next year. The King Abdullah Financial District station designed by Zaha Hadid Architects will be one of the most spectacular among 85 new stops.Construction of the Saudi Arabian capital’s new metro system will begin next year. The King Abdullah Financial District station designed by Zaha Hadid Architects will be one of the most spectacular among 85 new stops.

The Saudi government is investing $22 billion in the project.The Saudi government is investing $22 billion in the project.

An overhead projection of the King Abdullah Financial District station. An overhead projection of the King Abdullah Financial District station.

All train carriages will be air-conditioned and divided into first, family and single class.All train carriages will be air-conditioned and divided into first, family and single class.

Currently only 2% of commuters in Riyadh take public transportation. Unsurprising in a country where a gallon of gasoline costs only $0.50.Currently only 2% of commuters in Riyadh take public transportation. Unsurprising in a country where a gallon of gasoline costs only $0.50.

Artist's impression of a platform at the King Abdullah Financial District station. Artist’s impression of a platform at the King Abdullah Financial District station.


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(CNN) — Can car-loving Saudis be convinced to step out of their air-conditioned comfort and take public transport?

The Saudi Arabian government believes they can and is backing its belief by investing $22 billion into a public transport mega-project in the capital Riyadh.

Set to begin construction early next year, a new metro network will encompass over 176 km (110 miles) of train lines and 85 stations, linking the city center to universities, the airport, a newly built financial district and commercial areas.

The first trains as slated to run in 2019. During construction, it will be the world’s biggest public transport project, employing tens of thousands of people, developers say.

According to the High Commission for the Development of Arriyadh, all carriages will be air-conditioned and divided into first, family and single class.

Buses and trains take a distant second to personal cars in Riyadh and according to FCC Construction only 2% of commuters in the Saudi Arabian capital take public transport.

It’s no surprise because gasoline is highly subsidized — a gallon at the petrol pumps costs around $0.50. According to Bloomberg, the world’s largest oil producer ranks only second to Venezuela for the world’s cheapest gasoline. According to reports, the Saudi government is weighing up increasingly the cost of fuel to give public transport a boost.

Read more: Ramadan’s Super Bowl effect

Chronically underdeveloped until now, the expansion of public transport in the Saudi capital will also cope with the projected boom in the local population. It has more than doubled since 1990 to 5.3 million and is set to top 8 million by 2030.

“Riyadh today is one of the world’s fastest growing cities and our citizens deserve a world-class public transport system to enhance their quality of life… it will also help to reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality,” said Ibrahim Bin Muhammad Al Sultan President of Arriyadh Development Authority and Member of the High Commission for the Development of Arriyadh.

Of the six lines to be built, three will be constructed by Spain’s FCC Construction company, working in partnership in a consortium including Samsung and Alstom. U.S. Firm Bechtel and Italian company Ansaldo STS lead the other two construction consortia.

Read more: Google’s view from world’s tallest building

As well as an extensive network, it is hoped that the stunning look of some the new stations will help to tempt locals away from their cars.

Zaha Hadid Architects will build the King Abdullah Financial District station, one of the flagship interchange stops along Line 1. With six platforms spread over four floors, and linking three of the new lines, the architects hope it will provide a multi-function public space.

According to the architects, the white facade of the station will reduce heat from the punishing desert sun while the undulating lines of the building are meant to resemble the patterns generated by desert winds on sand dunes.


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Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/31/business/saudi-arabia-riyadh-metro-transportation-project/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/vHscYwbcn1c/space-stations-to-transform-riyadh

What we learned from Ashes


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Alastair Cook and Michael Clarke are the respective captains of England and Australia. The two countries have competed against each other since the first series Ashes in 1882 with the Urn the big prize.Alastair Cook and Michael Clarke are the respective captains of England and Australia. The two countries have competed against each other since the first series Ashes in 1882 with the Urn the big prize.

England is favorite to win this series after winning the past two editions. England won the five-match series 3-1 in Australia in 2011 -- its first win down under in 24 years.England is favorite to win this series after winning the past two editions. England won the five-match series 3-1 in Australia in 2011 — its first win down under in 24 years.

England's Kevin Pietersen is one of the most recognizable figures in world cricket. The batsman came to prominence during the 2005 series victory over Australia. England’s Kevin Pietersen is one of the most recognizable figures in world cricket. The batsman came to prominence during the 2005 series victory over Australia.

The 1981 series was named 'Botham's Ashes' after England's Ian Botham produced a heroic display to inspire a 3-1 series win. On the cusp of going 2-0 down, Botham hit 149 before Bob Willis claimed 8-43 to seal victory at Headingley, Leeds.The 1981 series was named ‘Botham’s Ashes’ after England’s Ian Botham produced a heroic display to inspire a 3-1 series win. On the cusp of going 2-0 down, Botham hit 149 before Bob Willis claimed 8-43 to seal victory at Headingley, Leeds.

Australia's Don Bradman, acknowledged as the finest batsman to have ever played the game, made his debut against England in 1928. He went on to score 5,028 runs in Ashes series during an illustrious career.Australia’s Don Bradman, acknowledged as the finest batsman to have ever played the game, made his debut against England in 1928. He went on to score 5,028 runs in Ashes series during an illustrious career.

Australia dominated the 1990s and early 2000's, winning nine out of 10 series. Its last victory came in 2007 when it defeated England 5-0. Between 1989 and 2003, Australia won eight straight series with the likes of Adam Gilchrist, Glenn McGrath and Ricky Ponting all involved.Australia dominated the 1990s and early 2000′s, winning nine out of 10 series. Its last victory came in 2007 when it defeated England 5-0. Between 1989 and 2003, Australia won eight straight series with the likes of Adam Gilchrist, Glenn McGrath and Ricky Ponting all involved.

Australian fast bowler McGrath and spin bowler Shane Warner combined to provide their team with one of the most fearsome attacks in world cricket. McGrath claimed 563 wickets in 124 matches, while Warne took 708 wickets in his career, the second highest of all time.Australian fast bowler McGrath and spin bowler Shane Warner combined to provide their team with one of the most fearsome attacks in world cricket. McGrath claimed 563 wickets in 124 matches, while Warne took 708 wickets in his career, the second highest of all time.

England cricket fans travel across the globe to support their team and have been nicknamed 'The Barmy Army'. They are particularly adept at giving the Australian players a piece of their mind.England cricket fans travel across the globe to support their team and have been nicknamed ‘The Barmy Army’. They are particularly adept at giving the Australian players a piece of their mind.

Australia's fans are known as 'The Fanatics' and will be hoping for something to shout about after losing the past two series.Australia’s fans are known as ‘The Fanatics’ and will be hoping for something to shout about after losing the past two series.

Andrew Flintoff, nicknamed Freddie, was the hero for England in 2005 as he helped wrestle the Ashes back for the first time in 18 years. Flintoff scored 402 runs and took 24 wickets in an epic series.Andrew Flintoff, nicknamed Freddie, was the hero for England in 2005 as he helped wrestle the Ashes back for the first time in 18 years. Flintoff scored 402 runs and took 24 wickets in an epic series.


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(CNN) — England’s 10-wicket hero and man-of-the-match James Anderson admitted to total exhaustion after his side held off a gritty Australian fight back to win an extraordinary first Ashes Test by 14 runs.

“It has been draining emotionally and physically,” said Anderson. “I’m lost for words – it’s been amazing.”

But the first Test also threw up questions about the use of technology in sport, with Australia ruing the Decision Review System (DRS) that appeared to weigh heavily against the Baggy Greens.

CNN looks at five things we learned from the first Test at Trent Bridge.

Technology equals controversy


World Sport Presents: Branded a Rebel


Part 3: Cricket makes a comeback

Collis King, hero of the West Indies' 1979 World Cup victory, reflects on his participation in the 1982-84 rebel tours in apartheid-era South Africa. His participation ended his international cricket career.Collis King, hero of the West Indies’ 1979 World Cup victory, reflects on his participation in the 1982-84 “rebel tours” in apartheid-era South Africa. His participation ended his international cricket career.

King, one of 18 rebels, chose to go to South Africa as he felt he was being overlooked by selectors. Well, cricket is my job, he said. You're not picking me, I'll go play cricket someplace where people will see proper cricket. And that's why I went.King, one of 18 “rebels,” chose to go to South Africa as he felt he was being overlooked by selectors. “Well, cricket is my job,” he said. “You’re not picking me, I’ll go play cricket someplace where people will see proper cricket. And that’s why I went.”

Franklyn Stephenson was only 23 when his international career was ended following his participation in the rebel tours. He is widely regarded as the best player to never officially represent the West Indies.Franklyn Stephenson was only 23 when his international career was ended following his participation in the “rebel tours.” He is widely regarded as the best player to never officially represent the West Indies.

 A West Indies tour blazer from the 1983 tour. I knew the tour was more important than being just cricket, said Stephenson. I believe that cricket can make a difference and I'm going to be a part of that team. A West Indies tour blazer from the 1983 tour. “I knew the tour was more important than being just cricket,” said Stephenson. “I believe that cricket can make a difference and I’m going to be a part of that team.”

Newspaper writer Al Gilkes was the only journalist from the Caribbean to cover the rebel tourists.I felt sorry for them, he said. I knew that they would never outlive what they were returning to.Newspaper writer Al Gilkes was the only journalist from the Caribbean to cover the rebel tourists.”I felt sorry for them,” he said. “I knew that they would never outlive what they were returning to.”

Barbados, one of the islands making up the group known as the West Indies, is one of the most cricket-mad Caribbean countries.Barbados, one of the islands making up the group known as the West Indies, is one of the most cricket-mad Caribbean countries.

The CNN World Sport documentary team visited a cricket clinic for kids in the island's capital Bridgetown.
The CNN World Sport documentary team visited a cricket clinic for kids in the island’s capital Bridgetown.

Young hopefuls at the clinic dream of replicating legendary batsmen like Brian Lara and Viv Richards.Young hopefuls at the clinic dream of replicating legendary batsmen like Brian Lara and Viv Richards.


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World Sport Presents: Branded a RebelWorld Sport Presents: Branded a Rebel

Unlike football, which has grappled with the issue of technological assistance for its embattled referees for years, cricket has long been comfortable with a little high tech help for its umpires.

DRS has been around in cricket since 2009; while not without its dissenters, by and large it has brought clarity and dampened down controversy in big games. Not in this match though.

As the old bumper sticker says, “to err is human; to foul things up completely requires a computer,” except here the human element was solely to blame.

From umpire Aleem Dar’s failure to pick up Stuart Broad’s clear edge to Australia’s wicketkeeper Brad Haddin, to a dozy ‘hot-spot’ camera operator who was still reviewing the previous ball as England appealed Jonathan Trott’s dismissal, this was an error-strewn performance by both the on and off-field umpiring team.

The look on Australian captain Michael Clarke’s face when he realized his profligate use of appeals had left him without recourse to the third umpire as Broad stood his ground summed up the frustration around DRS.

Read: The Ashes: Sport or an obsession

Broad’s decision not to walk was huge in itself, and prompted an impassioned debate that will linger for some time — some argued that he was a disgrace, others that he was simply being professional.

Interestingly the people who seemed least bothered by it were the players, possibly because — with very few exceptions — no one in top-flight cricket walks any more.

In the words of former Australian wicketkeeper Ian Healy, “walk in an Ashes Test match? Only if the car runs out of petrol!”

Interestingly though, Broad didn’t wait for the umpire’s signal when he did eventually depart. Perhaps even he was a bit embarrassed.

In the final analysis, much as was always argued when the umpires acted alone, the mistakes just about balanced themselves out.

Certainly, the Australian captain could learn much from the approach of his opposite number Alastair Cook, who used his appeals wisely — especially for the final decisive wicket.

But the fact that technology’s role was so central to so much controversy at Trent Bridge must be cause for concern.

The Ashes: England v Australia

10-14 July: 1st Test, Trent Bridge, Nottingham

18-22: 2nd Test, Lord’s, London

1-5 August: 3rd Test, Old Trafford, Manchester

9-13: 4th Test, Chester-le-Street, Durham

21-25: 5th Test, The Oval, London

Anderson is a true great

While the great Australian side that dominated world cricket from the early 90s into the 21st century was full of stars, its bowling attack was arguably the key to its supremacy.

Alongside the genius of spinner Shane Warne it was the metronomic precision and controlled aggression of fast bowler Glenn McGrath that kept the game’s best batsmen in check.

If the current Australian side is crying out for such a presence, England can rest easy in the knowledge that they have their own McGrath in Anderson.

The Lancashire pace bowler has matured into an intimidating mix of cool exactitude and thoughtful endeavour.

For over after over he pinned the Australian attack back, reining them in each time they threatened to break free and ensuring they could never relax.

It was a performance, on a pretty lifeless pitch, that underlined why he can now justifiably be ranked among the greatest pace bowlers.

His 10 wickets added to a career tally that should eventually see him overtake Ian Botham as England’s highest wicket-taker.

And his 10th wicket, albeit gained by the finest of margins and the faintest edge, may well be among those that come to define this Ashes series.

Australia is here to win


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Afghan cricket's big dreamsAfghan cricket’s big dreams

Ricky Ponting is carried from the field by David Warner, left, and Michael Clarke, his successor as Australia captain, after his 168th and final Test match.
Ricky Ponting is carried from the field by David Warner, left, and Michael Clarke, his successor as Australia captain, after his 168th and final Test match.

Ponting holds daughter Matisse (R), as his wife Riannna carries daughter Emmy (L), following Australia's defeat in the third and final Test of the series against South Africa at the WACA ground in Perth.Ponting holds daughter Matisse (R), as his wife Riannna carries daughter Emmy (L), following Australia’s defeat in the third and final Test of the series against South Africa at the WACA ground in Perth.

The 37-year-old was given a guard of honor by his opponents when he went out to bat on day four. South Africa captain Graeme Smith later described Ponting as the player I respect the most following a record-breaking career.The 37-year-old was given a guard of honor by his opponents when he went out to bat on day four. South Africa captain Graeme Smith later described Ponting as “the player I respect the most” following a record-breaking career.

Ponting, one of only three players to have scored more than 13,000 Test runs, managed a trademark early boundary as Australia chased a huge target of 623 to win.Ponting, one of only three players to have scored more than 13,000 Test runs, managed a trademark early boundary as Australia chased a huge target of 623 to win.

However, he fell for just eight runs and the home side went on to lose by 309 for a 1-0 series defeat as South Africa retained the top Test ranking.However, he fell for just eight runs and the home side went on to lose by 309 for a 1-0 series defeat as South Africa retained the top Test ranking.

He was given a standing ovation by the 7,000-strong crowd, having matched Steve Waugh's record of Test appearances for Australia. He was given a standing ovation by the 7,000-strong crowd, having matched Steve Waugh’s record of Test appearances for Australia.

A fan shows his appreciation for Ponting, who won a record 48 Tests as captain and was involved in 108 victories overall.A fan shows his appreciation for Ponting, who won a record 48 Tests as captain and was involved in 108 victories overall.


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Ricky Ponting ends cricket careerRicky Ponting ends cricket career

Mitchell Johnson, left, celebrates with wicketkeeper Matthew Wade after dismissing Tillakaratne Dilshan in the opening over of Sri Lanka's second innings in Melbourne.Mitchell Johnson, left, celebrates with wicketkeeper Matthew Wade after dismissing Tillakaratne Dilshan in the opening over of Sri Lanka’s second innings in Melbourne.

Johnson had earlier run out Dimuth Karunaratne in the same over as the tourists made the worst possible start before losing by an innings and 201 runs.Johnson had earlier run out Dimuth Karunaratne in the same over as the tourists made the worst possible start before losing by an innings and 201 runs.

The Australian bowlers once again tested the visiting batsmen, who struggled to cope with short-pitched deliveries. The Australian bowlers once again tested the visiting batsmen, who struggled to cope with short-pitched deliveries.

Man of the match Johnson was in fiery form, and one of his rising deliveries hit Kumar Sangakkara on the glove -- Sri Lanka's leading batsman was later diagnosed with a broken finger, ending his tour. Man of the match Johnson was in fiery form, and one of his rising deliveries hit Kumar Sangakkara on the glove — Sri Lanka’s leading batsman was later diagnosed with a broken finger, ending his tour.

Johnson was earlier denied his second Test century, being stranded on 92 when Australia's first innings came to a close on 460.Johnson was earlier denied his second Test century, being stranded on 92 when Australia’s first innings came to a close on 460.


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Johnson inspires Australian victoryJohnson inspires Australian victory

Australia arrived in England as clear underdogs, before cementing this status with an implosion in the ICC Champions Trophy that indicated a team in disarray.

If off field disciplinary issues and major changes in the coaching staff left many wondering what kind of shape this team would be in for the first Test, all agreed that — on paper at least — it had a long batting line-up.

None, however, would have predicted just how long.

Making his Test debut at just 19, there were few indications that Ashton Agar, taking the field with Australia on the brink of oblivion at 117 for 9, would deliver such a dazzling performance.

But what a performance it was — full of eye-catching stroke play and stylish shots that reached all parts of Trent Bridge, watched by a gaping crowd that became gradually more appreciative as the records tumbled.

As the highest ever score by an Australian number 11 became the highest ever score by any number 11, McGrath remarked that he thought he’d been presenting Agar’s Baggy Green cap to a bowler, not an all-rounder.

As the debutant reached 98, it seemed the whole stadium, as well as most of those observing via Twitter, were willing him into triple figures.

It wasn’t to be, as he lofted an overly ambitious boundary attempt into the hands of the Test’s soon-to-be pantomime villain, Broad, but the standing ovation he received was heartfelt.

Yes, he possibly should have been given out earlier, and it wasn’t quite enough to win the match for the Australians, but no one, English or Australian, will forget that innings.

At the other end of the age scale, the veteran Haddin’s performance on the final day was no less impressive, aided by James Pattinson he brought his team within a whisker of an implausible victory.

England beware: this team has a whale of a tail and bowlers will need to be at their best to clear the Australian decks.

The Ashes are still worth fighting for

The appeal of the Ashes comes in large part from the fearsome way in which the series is contested.

When England finally reclaimed the tiny urn in 2005 it was a release so cathartic that it elevated the series to new heights in the UK; and made Australia all the more determined to reclaim the prize, which they did emphatically in 2007.

However, recent contests have felt less competitive.

Tony Greig was best known in later years as a cricket commentator for Australia's Nine Network and other broadcasters around the world.Tony Greig was best known in later years as a cricket commentator for Australia’s Nine Network and other broadcasters around the world.

Seen here at the 2011 World Cup, he was well-known for his prematch pitch reports -- he stuck his car key into the playing surface to ascertain moisture levels.Seen here at the 2011 World Cup, he was well-known for his prematch pitch reports — he stuck his car key into the playing surface to ascertain moisture levels.

Last year he was honored for his work in Australian television at the Logie Awards, but he was diagnosed with lung cancer in October 2012 before passing away on December 29.Last year he was honored for his work in Australian television at the Logie Awards, but he was diagnosed with lung cancer in October 2012 before passing away on December 29.

Born in South Africa, he went on to captain England due to his Scottish father. In 1976 he was made to pay for comments that he would make the West Indies grovel as the tourists unleashed a fearsome pace attack.Born in South Africa, he went on to captain England due to his Scottish father. In 1976 he was made to pay for comments that he would make the West Indies “grovel” as the tourists unleashed a fearsome pace attack.

Having been beaten 3-0, he redeemed himself by leading England to a first series win in India in 15 years. However, his international career was soon to end. Having been beaten 3-0, he redeemed himself by leading England to a first series win in India in 15 years. However, his international career was soon to end.

Greig took the English cricket authorities to court in 1977 after they threatened to ban players he helped sign up for the rebel World Series Cricket competition.Greig took the English cricket authorities to court in 1977 after they threatened to ban players he helped sign up for the rebel World Series Cricket competition.

He won that battle but struggled in the Kerry Packer-funded tournament's first year, in which he was one of the captains along with West Indies' Clive Lloyd and Australia's Ian Chappell. However, it eventually proved a great success and transformed the way cricket was played and presented.He won that battle but struggled in the Kerry Packer-funded tournament’s first year, in which he was one of the captains along with West Indies’ Clive Lloyd and Australia’s Ian Chappell. However, it eventually proved a great success and transformed the way cricket was played and presented.


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Cricket revolutionary Greig passes awayCricket revolutionary Greig passes away

Basil D'Oliveira, affectionately known as Dolly, played 44 Tests for England, scoring 2,484 runs at an average of 40 and taking 47 wickets with his right-arm medium-pace bowling.Basil D’Oliveira, affectionately known as “Dolly,” played 44 Tests for England, scoring 2,484 runs at an average of 40 and taking 47 wickets with his right-arm medium-pace bowling.

D'Oliveira had two boys, Damian and Sean. Damian enjoyed a successful career at Worcestershire and is still on the coaching staff to this day.D’Oliveira had two boys, Damian and Sean. Damian enjoyed a successful career at Worcestershire and is still on the coaching staff to this day.

D'Oliveira, standing with wife Naomi and son Damian, was awarded the OBE by Queen Elizabeth II on October 29, 1969 at Buckingham Palace. He was also honored by the Royal Family in 2005 where he was awarded a CBE.D’Oliveira, standing with wife Naomi and son Damian, was awarded the OBE by Queen Elizabeth II on October 29, 1969 at Buckingham Palace. He was also honored by the Royal Family in 2005 where he was awarded a CBE.

Pictured alongside fellow England player Alan Knott, D'Oliveira became an integral part of the international setup after making his debut against the West Indies in 1966. He scored his first century against India the following year, but it was his historic innings of 158 against Australia in August 1968 which sent shock waves through the cricket world.Pictured alongside fellow England player Alan Knott, D’Oliveira became an integral part of the international setup after making his debut against the West Indies in 1966. He scored his first century against India the following year, but it was his historic innings of 158 against Australia in August 1968 which sent shock waves through the cricket world.

D'Oliveira was then expected to be named in the squad to tour South Africa the next day -- but he wasn't. His omission by the Marylebone Cricket Club, which chose the England team, was met with anger with the public -- who believed that the ruling body had bowed to South Africa's racist regime.D’Oliveira was then expected to be named in the squad to tour South Africa the next day — but he wasn’t. His omission by the Marylebone Cricket Club, which chose the England team, was met with anger with the public — who believed that the ruling body had bowed to South Africa’s racist regime.

South Africa's then prime minister John Vorster, a staunch advocate of apartheid, canceled England's tour to the country following confirmation that D'Oliveira had been named in the squad. He said: We are not prepared to accept a team thrust upon us by people whose interests are not the game, but to gain certain political objectives which they do not even attempt to hide.South Africa’s then prime minister John Vorster, a staunch advocate of apartheid, canceled England’s tour to the country following confirmation that D’Oliveira had been named in the squad. He said: “We are not prepared to accept a team thrust upon us by people whose interests are not the game, but to gain certain political objectives which they do not even attempt to hide.”

In opposition to the apartheid politics of South Africa, this group of cricketers formed the Stop the Seventy Tour, a committee set up to stop that year's tour of the South African cricket team to England. On the far right sits Peter Hain, leader of the Young Liberals and a future British MP.In opposition to the apartheid politics of South Africa, this group of cricketers formed the “Stop the Seventy Tour,” a committee set up to stop that year’s tour of the South African cricket team to England. On the far right sits Peter Hain, leader of the Young Liberals and a future British MP.

Former captain Mike Gatting led a rebel England tour to South Africa in 1990, where he was met with huge criticism and opposition by black South Africans. The 16 England players involved were being paid by the apartheid government rather than corporate sponsors, which had also been the case on previous rebel tours.Former captain Mike Gatting led a rebel England tour to South Africa in 1990, where he was met with huge criticism and opposition by black South Africans. The 16 England players involved were being paid by the apartheid government rather than corporate sponsors, which had also been the case on previous rebel tours.

According to Peter Oborne, who wrote Basil D'Oliveira. Cricket and Conspiracy: The Untold Story, D'Oliveira was invited to lunch by Nelson Mandela following a coaching trip to South Africa. At the end Mandela rose from his chair and hugged D'Oliveira. 'Thanks for coming, Basil,' he said. 'You must go home now. You've done your bit.' According to Peter Oborne, who wrote “Basil D’Oliveira. Cricket and Conspiracy: The Untold Story,” D’Oliveira was invited to lunch by Nelson Mandela following a coaching trip to South Africa. “At the end Mandela rose from his chair and hugged D’Oliveira. ‘Thanks for coming, Basil,’ he said. ‘You must go home now. You’ve done your bit.’ ”

South Africa did not play international cricket from 1970 to 1991 after being hit with sanctions in a bid to defeat apartheid. It returned with two one-day games in India before competing at the 1992 World Cup in Australia. That year it returned to Test match cricket, playing the West Indies.South Africa did not play international cricket from 1970 to 1991 after being hit with sanctions in a bid to defeat apartheid. It returned with two one-day games in India before competing at the 1992 World Cup in Australia. That year it returned to Test match cricket, playing the West Indies.

South Africa captain Graeme Smith celebrates with the Basil D'Oliveira trophy after taking the 2012 Test match series following victory over England. South Africa captain Graeme Smith celebrates with the Basil D’Oliveira trophy after taking the 2012 Test match series following victory over England.


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How Basil batted against apartheidHow Basil batted against apartheid

As the Australians struggled to rebuild, and England became ever more proficient and professional, it felt as though this year’s series might lack a little of the appeal of recent years.

By Sunday at Trent Bridge, those fears had been dispelled so emphatically that the very idea of a lacklustre Ashes seemed laughable.

This was, it was unanimously agreed, one of the best ever Ashes Tests, and quite possibly one of the best ever Test matches.

New rivalries, fresh controversies and innumerable talking points conspired to ensure that the second Test will be the most hotly anticipated for years.

The fact that much of the UK is currently basking in a heatwave only added to the sense of enjoyment from the home fans, but even in defeat the Australians could draw succour from the fact that their team can clearly make a decent fist of winning the series.

Clarke’s dignified speech as he congratulated England spoke of a man well aware he had been part of something special. And best of all, this is just the beginning of back-to-back series in 2013.

Test cricket is still uniquely compelling

By the end of Wednesday those fans with tickets for Saturday’s action were justifiably pondering other plans.

Batsman after batsman failed to rein in his desire to play at every delivery, with wickets lost due primarily to poor decision making.

Bowling, too, was erratic — the Australians giving away 21 runs to the extras column.

Even the idea that the match could be over before Friday was being seriously discussed, and inevitably that discussion turned to the format of Test cricket.

Batsmen, it was agreed, were too used to the speed of Twenty20 and 50-over games; skills that fed a long innings, such as the ability to safely leave a ball, had been lost in the pressure to score quickly.

Punters preferred the quick fix entertainment of shorter forms of the game and this was the result.

As the Test entered the afternoon session on the fifth day, however, it became clear that this type of cricket still offers something unique.

This was like choosing an Emmy award winning DVD box set over a summer sci-fi blockbuster.

As the hours and days rolled by, nuance, sub-plots, character development and twists were revealed that would be impossible in the frenetic environment of limited overs cricket.

Trent Bridge was by turns feather bed and cauldron for the protagonists as the game’s story evolved; nails were shorn to their stumps, eyes raised plaintively to the heavens by players and fans alike, cries of anguish were matched by sighs of relief and gasps of wonderment, eyes squinted intently at the square throughout.

This utterly enthralling contest was the perfect reminder of what Test cricket can offer.


Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/15/sport/cricket-ashes-five-things-we-learned/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/mT8QZOg1SAs/what-we-learned-from-ashes

Morsy ‘victim’ of Egypt’s revolution

Editor’s note: Send us your experiences, but please stay safe. Read this in Arabic

Cairo (CNN) — From the rooftop of a mosque in the Cairo district of Nasr City, I watched as thousands of supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy frantically waved posters and chanted angrily.

Moments before they heard that the man who, just a year ago, had been declared Egypt’s first ever democratically elected president had been ousted.

The people who had jammed into Tahrir Square on June 30, 2012 to celebrate his inauguration were shocked and enraged.

When long-serving President Hosni Mubarak was toppled from power two and a half years ago, it was the beginning, not the end, of a revolution that has yet to run its course.

Prior to 2011, the presumption among many Egyptians and foreign observers alike was that the long-suffering people of Egypt had an almost bottomless reserve of patience, that as long as they could feed their families, they would put up with whoever was in power.

A man rests on a bench Wednesday, July 10, in Cairo as the Muslim holy month of Ramadan gets under way. Egypt remains in a state of political paralysis following the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsy. See photos of protests that have engulfed the country.A man rests on a bench Wednesday, July 10, in Cairo as the Muslim holy month of Ramadan gets under way. Egypt remains in a state of political paralysis following the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsy. See photos of protests that have engulfed the country.

Supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsy rally in Nasr City, Egypt, a suburb of Cairo, on Monday, July 8. Supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsy rally in Nasr City, Egypt, a suburb of Cairo, on Monday, July 8.

A man reacts after seeing the body of a family member at the Liltaqmeen al-Sahy Hospital in Cairo, allegedly killed during a sit-in supporting Morsy in front of the Republican Guard headquarters on July 8.A man reacts after seeing the body of a family member at the Liltaqmeen al-Sahy Hospital in Cairo, allegedly killed during a sit-in supporting Morsy in front of the Republican Guard headquarters on July 8.

Injured men receive medical attention after clashes between supporters of Morsy and security forces in Cairo on July 8.Injured men receive medical attention after clashes between supporters of Morsy and security forces in Cairo on July 8.

Opponents of Mohamed Morsy gather at Tahrir Square during a protest in Cairo on Sunday, July 7.Opponents of Mohamed Morsy gather at Tahrir Square during a protest in Cairo on Sunday, July 7.

Supporters of Morsy pray next to the headquarters of the Republican Guards in Cairo on Saturday, July 6, during the funeral of seven people killed during clashes. Supporters of Morsy pray next to the headquarters of the Republican Guards in Cairo on Saturday, July 6, during the funeral of seven people killed during clashes.

People carry coffins on July 6 of two Morsy opponents who were killed during clashes in Cairo.People carry coffins on July 6 of two Morsy opponents who were killed during clashes in Cairo.

A Morsy supporter joins protests near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 6.A Morsy supporter joins protests near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 6.

Supporters and opponents of Morsy clash in Cairo on Friday, July 5.Supporters and opponents of Morsy clash in Cairo on Friday, July 5.

A protester is attended to in Cairo's Tahrir Square during fighting between the pro- and anti-Morsy crowds on July 5.A protester is attended to in Cairo’s Tahrir Square during fighting between the pro- and anti-Morsy crowds on July 5.

An Egyptian military helicopter hovers over supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and deposed President Mohamed Morsy in Cairo on July 5.An Egyptian military helicopter hovers over supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and deposed President Mohamed Morsy in Cairo on July 5.

Morsy supporters hold up their bloodstained hands after Egypt's armed forces opened fire on rally in front of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5.Morsy supporters hold up their bloodstained hands after Egypt’s armed forces opened fire on rally in front of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5.

Morsy supporters carry a man who was shot during clashes next to the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5. State broadcaster Nile TV said a number of those backing the deposed leader were wounded as they tried to storm the headquarters, where Morsy reportedly was being held.Morsy supporters carry a man who was shot during clashes next to the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5. State broadcaster Nile TV said a number of those backing the deposed leader were wounded as they tried to storm the headquarters, where Morsy reportedly was being held.

A wounded man is helped following the gun battle outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5.A wounded man is helped following the gun battle outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5.

Egyptians hold portraits of Gen. Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi reading Come down, Sisi as they gather in Cairo's landmark Tahrir Square on July 5.Egyptians hold portraits of Gen. Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi reading “Come down, Sisi” as they gather in Cairo’s landmark Tahrir Square on July 5.

Morsy supporters react to an explosion during clashes with police officers on July 5 outside Cairo University in Giza.Morsy supporters react to an explosion during clashes with police officers on July 5 outside Cairo University in Giza.

Egyptian Army soldiers stand guard at the Cairo headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5 as an Apache attack helicopter flies overhead.Egyptian Army soldiers stand guard at the Cairo headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5 as an Apache attack helicopter flies overhead.

Morsy supporters pray near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 5.Morsy supporters pray near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 5.

A man prays on July 5 before the protest near the University of Cairo.A man prays on July 5 before the protest near the University of Cairo.

Protesters take cover from tear gas during clashes outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard in Cairo on July 5.Protesters take cover from tear gas during clashes outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard in Cairo on July 5.

A military helicopter flies by Egypt's Presidential Palace in Cairo on July 5.A military helicopter flies by Egypt’s Presidential Palace in Cairo on July 5.

Egyptians watch fireworks in Tahrir Square on Thursday, July 4, the day after Morsy's ouster.Egyptians watch fireworks in Tahrir Square on Thursday, July 4, the day after Morsy’s ouster.

People dance and cheer in the streets of Cairo on July 4.People dance and cheer in the streets of Cairo on July 4.

A Morsy supporter holds a poster of the deposed president during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.A Morsy supporter holds a poster of the deposed president during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.

A massive crowd gathers in Tahrir Square on July 4.A massive crowd gathers in Tahrir Square on July 4.

Egyptians cheer and wave national flags as airplanes fly above Tahrir Square on July 4, leaving a trail of smoke in the colors of the national flag.Egyptians cheer and wave national flags as airplanes fly above Tahrir Square on July 4, leaving a trail of smoke in the colors of the national flag.

A woman uses a mobile phone to record the July 4 celebrations in Tahrir Square.A woman uses a mobile phone to record the July 4 celebrations in Tahrir Square.

An opposition protester chants slogans against Morsy near Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered on July 4 to show support for the ousted president.An opposition protester chants slogans against Morsy near Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered on July 4 to show support for the ousted president.

A man holds a newspaper near Mesaha Square in Cairo on July 4.A man holds a newspaper near Mesaha Square in Cairo on July 4.

Dejected Morsy supporters attend a rally in Nasr City on July 4.Dejected Morsy supporters attend a rally in Nasr City on July 4.

A Morsy supporter shows his bloodied shirt during a July 4 rally near the University of Cairo.A Morsy supporter shows his bloodied shirt during a July 4 rally near the University of Cairo.

A young Egyptian boy shoots off fireworks during celebrations in Tahrir Square on July 4.A young Egyptian boy shoots off fireworks during celebrations in Tahrir Square on July 4.

People walk by a pile of Egyptian flags for sale in Tahrir Square on July 4.People walk by a pile of Egyptian flags for sale in Tahrir Square on July 4.

Crowds throng Tahrir Square on July 4.Crowds throng Tahrir Square on July 4.

Egyptian soldiers deploy near Cairo University on July 4.Egyptian soldiers deploy near Cairo University on July 4.

People dance and cheer at Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 4.People dance and cheer at Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 4.

Adly Mansour, center, stands after delivering a speech during his swearing-in ceremony as Egypt's interim president in the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo on July 4. Mansour has served as the head of the country's Supreme Constitutional Court.Adly Mansour, center, stands after delivering a speech during his swearing-in ceremony as Egypt’s interim president in the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo on July 4. Mansour has served as the head of the country’s Supreme Constitutional Court.

Armored vehicles with the Egyptian army sit at a checkpoint in the Cairo district of Nasr City on July 4.Armored vehicles with the Egyptian army sit at a checkpoint in the Cairo district of Nasr City on July 4.

A Morsy supporter reacts as a military helicopter flies over during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.A Morsy supporter reacts as a military helicopter flies over during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.

A boy with face paint the color of the Egyptian flag pauses on July 4 in Tahrir Square.A boy with face paint the color of the Egyptian flag pauses on July 4 in Tahrir Square.

A pedestrian shakes hands with a member of the military at a roadblock in Giza.A pedestrian shakes hands with a member of the military at a roadblock in Giza.

Security personnel rest on July 4 in Tahrir Square.Security personnel rest on July 4 in Tahrir Square.

A man walks to Tahrir Square on July 4.A man walks to Tahrir Square on July 4.

A family sleeps on a bridge near Tahrir Square on July 4.A family sleeps on a bridge near Tahrir Square on July 4.

A member of the Egyptian military redirects traffic on July 4 at a roadblock in Giza.A member of the Egyptian military redirects traffic on July 4 at a roadblock in Giza.

Bread is sold near Tahrir Square on July 4.Bread is sold near Tahrir Square on July 4.

An Egyptian military member guards a roadblock in Giza on July 4.An Egyptian military member guards a roadblock in Giza on July 4.


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Photos: Unrest in EgyptPhotos: Unrest in Egypt


Youths’ killing ignites outrage in Egypt


Writer: Morsy unwilling to be inclusive


Egypt after Morsy: Turbulent transition

Read: Factions, democracy? What’s next for Egypt?

The uprising that banished Mubarak unleashed energy and a passion that shows no sign of diminishing. If Morsy thought his election victory a year ago, in which he won 51.7% of the vote, was a mandate, he was sorely mistaken.

But Morsy’s head never lay steady atop the state. The police never trusted him — nor did Christians. The army was suspicious and the business community dubious. Many voted for Morsy simply because they saw him as the lesser of two evils, running against former Mubarak stalwart Ahmed Shafiq.

Read: Egypt’s biggest challenges

One activist I spoke to, who only gave his name as Abdel Hadi, compared the two candidates during the presidential elections.

“You have two drugs,” he told me. “One, Ahmed Shafiq kills you, and the other, Morsy, gives you a bad stomach ache. They’re both bad, but Morsy’s drug is light. It doesn’t kill you. So we’ll give Morsy four years. If he doesn’t work out, we’ll come back to Tahrir and bring him down.”

Abdel Hadi’s words, spoken in June 2012, were prophetic.

Analysis: What is Muslim Brotherhood?

The night before the massive anti-Morsy demonstrations on June 30, in a packed Tahrir Square, I found people already convinced their president of just one year was soon to be history.

“He’s out, he’s over, he’s finished,” one man shouted to me.

“We’ve gone downhill all the way in that year, economically, security wise,” said Abdal Rahman, a businessman. “It’s over. They’ve split Egypt in two, Islamists and non-Islamists. We’re all Muslims and we’re all believers. Our conflict was a political conflict. They’re switched it to a religious conflict.”

Many Egyptians were deeply offended that Morsy and the Muslim Brotherhood put their identity as Muslims before their identity as Egyptians. This is a country profoundly proud of its rich heritage, and quick to take offense at those who seem to disregard its place in history.

Last November, many were appalled when a Muslim radical, Morgan Al-Gohary, appeared on talk show on a private TV channel and declared if he and his ilk ever came to power they would destroy some of Egypt’s most revered monuments. During the program, he claimed he took part in the demolition of Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Buddha statues in March 2001.

The show’s host, Wael Al-Abrashi asked, “So you would destroy the sphinx and the pyramids?”

Al-Gohary: “Yes, we will destroy them, if they were worshiped before or afterwards.”

One guest, clearly repulsed, told Al-Gohary, “You don’t know the history of your country well. The pharaohs were the first to know religion in the world.” The Sphinx and the pyramids, he continued, “are mankind’s heritage and not the property of the Egyptians alone, they are the property of all mankind.”

Although neither Morsy, nor the Brotherhood, ever advocated such a course of action, many questioned their intentions and accused the Brotherhood of harboring barely concealed intent to turn Egypt into a Taliban-style Islamic state.

That was an intangible complaint. Others were more blatant. The economy withered under Morsy, as Egyptians suffered through frequent and prolonged power cuts and fumed in long lines outside petrol stations. Morsy’s promises of prosperity and security never materialized. So the people mobilized.

The country’s powerful army, responding to the millions in the street, forced Morsy from power on the evening of July 3.

But in the brave, new Egypt, no one gives up without a fight. The celebrations in Tahrir were mirrored by angry demonstrations outside Cairo Univeristy and in Nasr City.

“No one is going to take our vote,” a woman shouted to me in front of the university.

“These are legitimate elections,” exclaimed her husband. “All the people have approved his legitimacy. He is our legitimate president. How can he [Defense Minister Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi] take this from us?”

Morsy’s sudden transformation, from president of the Arab Republic of Egypt, to prisoner, reminded me of something newspaper editor Hani Shukrallah had told me just one year before, on the eve of Morsy’s victory.

Egyptians, he said, now “have a sense of their own rights. They have a sense of their personal dignity. They perceive themselves as citizens and this is something that is new for an old guy like me. They look at the state as their servant and not their master.”

Morsy, their servant, did a bad job so they fired him.

The real revolution in Egypt is not in the streets. It’s in the mind.


Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/11/world/meast/egypt-reporter-notebook-wedeman/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/fCYQxjctyPg/morsy-victim-of-egypts-revolution

Egypt’s ‘revolution of the mind’

Editor’s note: Send us your experiences, but please stay safe. Read this in Arabic

Cairo (CNN) — From the rooftop of a mosque in the Cairo district of Nasr City, I watched as thousands of supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy frantically waved posters and chanted angrily.

Moments before they heard that the man who, just a year ago, had been declared Egypt’s first ever democratically elected president had been ousted.

The people who had jammed into Tahrir Square on June 30, 2012 to celebrate his inauguration were shocked and enraged.

When long-serving President Hosni Mubarak was toppled from power two and a half years ago, it was the beginning, not the end, of a revolution that has yet to run its course.

Prior to 2011, the presumption among many Egyptians and foreign observers alike was that the long-suffering people of Egypt had an almost bottomless reserve of patience, that as long as they could feed their families, they would put up with whoever was in power.

A man rests on a bench Wednesday, July 10, in Cairo as the Muslim holy month of Ramadan gets under way. Egypt remains in a state of political paralysis following the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsy. See photos of protests that have engulfed the country.A man rests on a bench Wednesday, July 10, in Cairo as the Muslim holy month of Ramadan gets under way. Egypt remains in a state of political paralysis following the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsy. See photos of protests that have engulfed the country.

Supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsy rally in Nasr City, Egypt, a suburb of Cairo, on Monday, July 8. Supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsy rally in Nasr City, Egypt, a suburb of Cairo, on Monday, July 8.

A man reacts after seeing the body of a family member at the Liltaqmeen al-Sahy Hospital in Cairo, allegedly killed during a sit-in supporting Morsy in front of the Republican Guard headquarters on July 8.A man reacts after seeing the body of a family member at the Liltaqmeen al-Sahy Hospital in Cairo, allegedly killed during a sit-in supporting Morsy in front of the Republican Guard headquarters on July 8.

Injured men receive medical attention after clashes between supporters of Morsy and security forces in Cairo on July 8.Injured men receive medical attention after clashes between supporters of Morsy and security forces in Cairo on July 8.

Opponents of Mohamed Morsy gather at Tahrir Square during a protest in Cairo on Sunday, July 7.Opponents of Mohamed Morsy gather at Tahrir Square during a protest in Cairo on Sunday, July 7.

Supporters of Morsy pray next to the headquarters of the Republican Guards in Cairo on Saturday, July 6, during the funeral of seven people killed during clashes. Supporters of Morsy pray next to the headquarters of the Republican Guards in Cairo on Saturday, July 6, during the funeral of seven people killed during clashes.

People carry coffins on July 6 of two Morsy opponents who were killed during clashes in Cairo.People carry coffins on July 6 of two Morsy opponents who were killed during clashes in Cairo.

A Morsy supporter joins protests near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 6.A Morsy supporter joins protests near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 6.

Supporters and opponents of Morsy clash in Cairo on Friday, July 5.Supporters and opponents of Morsy clash in Cairo on Friday, July 5.

A protester is attended to in Cairo's Tahrir Square during fighting between the pro- and anti-Morsy crowds on July 5.A protester is attended to in Cairo’s Tahrir Square during fighting between the pro- and anti-Morsy crowds on July 5.

An Egyptian military helicopter hovers over supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and deposed President Mohamed Morsy in Cairo on July 5.An Egyptian military helicopter hovers over supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and deposed President Mohamed Morsy in Cairo on July 5.

Morsy supporters hold up their bloodstained hands after Egypt's armed forces opened fire on rally in front of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5.Morsy supporters hold up their bloodstained hands after Egypt’s armed forces opened fire on rally in front of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5.

Morsy supporters carry a man who was shot during clashes next to the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5. State broadcaster Nile TV said a number of those backing the deposed leader were wounded as they tried to storm the headquarters, where Morsy reportedly was being held.Morsy supporters carry a man who was shot during clashes next to the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo on July 5. State broadcaster Nile TV said a number of those backing the deposed leader were wounded as they tried to storm the headquarters, where Morsy reportedly was being held.

A wounded man is helped following the gun battle outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5.A wounded man is helped following the gun battle outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5.

Egyptians hold portraits of Gen. Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi reading Come down, Sisi as they gather in Cairo's landmark Tahrir Square on July 5.Egyptians hold portraits of Gen. Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi reading “Come down, Sisi” as they gather in Cairo’s landmark Tahrir Square on July 5.

Morsy supporters react to an explosion during clashes with police officers on July 5 outside Cairo University in Giza.Morsy supporters react to an explosion during clashes with police officers on July 5 outside Cairo University in Giza.

Egyptian Army soldiers stand guard at the Cairo headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5 as an Apache attack helicopter flies overhead.Egyptian Army soldiers stand guard at the Cairo headquarters of the Republican Guard on July 5 as an Apache attack helicopter flies overhead.

Morsy supporters pray near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 5.Morsy supporters pray near the University of Cairo in Giza on July 5.

A man prays on July 5 before the protest near the University of Cairo.A man prays on July 5 before the protest near the University of Cairo.

Protesters take cover from tear gas during clashes outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard in Cairo on July 5.Protesters take cover from tear gas during clashes outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard in Cairo on July 5.

A military helicopter flies by Egypt's Presidential Palace in Cairo on July 5.A military helicopter flies by Egypt’s Presidential Palace in Cairo on July 5.

Egyptians watch fireworks in Tahrir Square on Thursday, July 4, the day after Morsy's ouster.Egyptians watch fireworks in Tahrir Square on Thursday, July 4, the day after Morsy’s ouster.

People dance and cheer in the streets of Cairo on July 4.People dance and cheer in the streets of Cairo on July 4.

A Morsy supporter holds a poster of the deposed president during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.A Morsy supporter holds a poster of the deposed president during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.

A massive crowd gathers in Tahrir Square on July 4.A massive crowd gathers in Tahrir Square on July 4.

Egyptians cheer and wave national flags as airplanes fly above Tahrir Square on July 4, leaving a trail of smoke in the colors of the national flag.Egyptians cheer and wave national flags as airplanes fly above Tahrir Square on July 4, leaving a trail of smoke in the colors of the national flag.

A woman uses a mobile phone to record the July 4 celebrations in Tahrir Square.A woman uses a mobile phone to record the July 4 celebrations in Tahrir Square.

An opposition protester chants slogans against Morsy near Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered on July 4 to show support for the ousted president.An opposition protester chants slogans against Morsy near Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered on July 4 to show support for the ousted president.

A man holds a newspaper near Mesaha Square in Cairo on July 4.A man holds a newspaper near Mesaha Square in Cairo on July 4.

Dejected Morsy supporters attend a rally in Nasr City on July 4.Dejected Morsy supporters attend a rally in Nasr City on July 4.

A Morsy supporter shows his bloodied shirt during a July 4 rally near the University of Cairo.A Morsy supporter shows his bloodied shirt during a July 4 rally near the University of Cairo.

A young Egyptian boy shoots off fireworks during celebrations in Tahrir Square on July 4.A young Egyptian boy shoots off fireworks during celebrations in Tahrir Square on July 4.

People walk by a pile of Egyptian flags for sale in Tahrir Square on July 4.People walk by a pile of Egyptian flags for sale in Tahrir Square on July 4.

Crowds throng Tahrir Square on July 4.Crowds throng Tahrir Square on July 4.

Egyptian soldiers deploy near Cairo University on July 4.Egyptian soldiers deploy near Cairo University on July 4.

People dance and cheer at Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 4.People dance and cheer at Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 4.

Adly Mansour, center, stands after delivering a speech during his swearing-in ceremony as Egypt's interim president in the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo on July 4. Mansour has served as the head of the country's Supreme Constitutional Court.Adly Mansour, center, stands after delivering a speech during his swearing-in ceremony as Egypt’s interim president in the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo on July 4. Mansour has served as the head of the country’s Supreme Constitutional Court.

Armored vehicles with the Egyptian army sit at a checkpoint in the Cairo district of Nasr City on July 4.Armored vehicles with the Egyptian army sit at a checkpoint in the Cairo district of Nasr City on July 4.

A Morsy supporter reacts as a military helicopter flies over during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.A Morsy supporter reacts as a military helicopter flies over during a July 4 rally in Nasr City.

A boy with face paint the color of the Egyptian flag pauses on July 4 in Tahrir Square.A boy with face paint the color of the Egyptian flag pauses on July 4 in Tahrir Square.

A pedestrian shakes hands with a member of the military at a roadblock in Giza.A pedestrian shakes hands with a member of the military at a roadblock in Giza.

Security personnel rest on July 4 in Tahrir Square.Security personnel rest on July 4 in Tahrir Square.

A man walks to Tahrir Square on July 4.A man walks to Tahrir Square on July 4.

A family sleeps on a bridge near Tahrir Square on July 4.A family sleeps on a bridge near Tahrir Square on July 4.

A member of the Egyptian military redirects traffic on July 4 at a roadblock in Giza.A member of the Egyptian military redirects traffic on July 4 at a roadblock in Giza.

Bread is sold near Tahrir Square on July 4.Bread is sold near Tahrir Square on July 4.

An Egyptian military member guards a roadblock in Giza on July 4.An Egyptian military member guards a roadblock in Giza on July 4.


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Photos: Unrest in EgyptPhotos: Unrest in Egypt


Youths’ killing ignites outrage in Egypt


Writer: Morsy unwilling to be inclusive


Egypt after Morsy: Turbulent transition

Read: Factions, democracy? What’s next for Egypt?

The uprising that banished Mubarak unleashed energy and a passion that shows no sign of diminishing. If Morsy thought his election victory a year ago, in which he won 51.7% of the vote, was a mandate, he was sorely mistaken.

But Morsy’s head never lay steady atop the state. The police never trusted him — nor did Christians. The army was suspicious and the business community dubious. Many voted for Morsy simply because they saw him as the lesser of two evils, running against former Mubarak stalwart Ahmed Shafiq.

Read: Egypt’s biggest challenges

One activist I spoke to, who only gave his name as Abdel Hadi, compared the two candidates during the presidential elections.

“You have two drugs,” he told me. “One, Ahmed Shafiq kills you, and the other, Morsy, gives you a bad stomach ache. They’re both bad, but Morsy’s drug is light. It doesn’t kill you. So we’ll give Morsy four years. If he doesn’t work out, we’ll come back to Tahrir and bring him down.”

Abdel Hadi’s words, spoken in June 2012, were prophetic.

Analysis: What is Muslim Brotherhood?

The night before the massive anti-Morsy demonstrations on June 30, in a packed Tahrir Square, I found people already convinced their president of just one year was soon to be history.

“He’s out, he’s over, he’s finished,” one man shouted to me.

“We’ve gone downhill all the way in that year, economically, security wise,” said Abdal Rahman, a businessman. “It’s over. They’ve split Egypt in two, Islamists and non-Islamists. We’re all Muslims and we’re all believers. Our conflict was a political conflict. They’re switched it to a religious conflict.”

Many Egyptians were deeply offended that Morsy and the Muslim Brotherhood put their identity as Muslims before their identity as Egyptians. This is a country profoundly proud of its rich heritage, and quick to take offense at those who seem to disregard its place in history.

Last November, many were appalled when a Muslim radical, Morgan Al-Gohary, appeared on talk show on a private TV channel and declared if he and his ilk ever came to power they would destroy some of Egypt’s most revered monuments. During the program, he claimed he took part in the demolition of Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Buddha statues in March 2001.

The show’s host, Wael Al-Abrashi asked, “So you would destroy the sphinx and the pyramids?”

Al-Gohary: “Yes, we will destroy them, if they were worshiped before or afterwards.”

One guest, clearly repulsed, told Al-Gohary, “You don’t know the history of your country well. The pharaohs were the first to know religion in the world.” The Sphinx and the pyramids, he continued, “are mankind’s heritage and not the property of the Egyptians alone, they are the property of all mankind.”

Although neither Morsy, nor the Brotherhood, ever advocated such a course of action, many questioned their intentions and accused the Brotherhood of harboring barely concealed intent to turn Egypt into a Taliban-style Islamic state.

That was an intangible complaint. Others were more blatant. The economy withered under Morsy, as Egyptians suffered through frequent and prolonged power cuts and fumed in long lines outside petrol stations. Morsy’s promises of prosperity and security never materialized. So the people mobilized.

The country’s powerful army, responding to the millions in the street, forced Morsy from power on the evening of July 3.

But in the brave, new Egypt, no one gives up without a fight. The celebrations in Tahrir were mirrored by angry demonstrations outside Cairo Univeristy and in Nasr City.

“No one is going to take our vote,” a woman shouted to me in front of the university.

“These are legitimate elections,” exclaimed her husband. “All the people have approved his legitimacy. He is our legitimate president. How can he [Defense Minister Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi] take this from us?”

Morsy’s sudden transformation, from president of the Arab Republic of Egypt, to prisoner, reminded me of something newspaper editor Hani Shukrallah had told me just one year before, on the eve of Morsy’s victory.

Egyptians, he said, now “have a sense of their own rights. They have a sense of their personal dignity. They perceive themselves as citizens and this is something that is new for an old guy like me. They look at the state as their servant and not their master.”

Morsy, their servant, did a bad job so they fired him.

The real revolution in Egypt is not in the streets. It’s in the mind.


Article source: http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/4dAeqTh63YQ/index.html

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/4-5CT-V4P0o/egypts-revolution-of-the-mind

Voices from Cairo’s streets


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iReportera href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/CouclaRefaat' Alia Coucla Refaat/a captured this image of protesters demonstrating against former President Mohamed Morsy on Tuesday, July 2, on the streets of Cairo. The streets are full of chanting and love, she said. Men are being respectful to women, giving us our space to take part in this revolution.iReporter Alia Coucla Refaat captured this image of protesters demonstrating against former President Mohamed Morsy on Tuesday, July 2, on the streets of Cairo. “The streets are full of chanting and love,” she said. “Men are being respectful to women, giving us our space to take part in this revolution.”

iReporter a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/mgkab'Malak Kabbani/a sent in images from protests held July 2. She told CNN: The energy in Tahrir is very positive, the protests have been very peaceful all over Cairo and surrounding Egyptian states so far. iReporter Malak Kabbani sent in images from protests held July 2. She told CNN: “The energy in Tahrir is very positive, the protests have been very peaceful all over Cairo and surrounding Egyptian states so far.”

While photographing the protesters,a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/MahmoudGamal' Mahmoud Gamal/a felt as though there was a sense of rage within protesters. You could consider it a new wave of rage in this revolution, he said.While photographing the protesters, Mahmoud Gamal felt as though there was a sense of rage within protesters. “You could consider it a new wave of rage in this revolution,” he said.

I believe that the call for an early presidential election is fair enough, iReporter a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/MahmoudGamal'Mahmoud Gamal /asaid. “I believe that the call for an early presidential election is fair enough,” iReporter Mahmoud Gamal said.

Veteran iReporter and protester a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/arasquare'Ahmed Raafat/a captured images and videos of protesters demonstrating against Egypt's president on Monday, July 1. I'm not sure what's going to happen, but I think the situation will continue to escalate, he says.Veteran iReporter and protester Ahmed Raafat captured images and videos of protesters demonstrating against Egypt’s president on Monday, July 1. “I’m not sure what’s going to happen, but I think the situation will continue to escalate,” he says.

Egyptian iReporter and photographera href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/Boraie' Mohamed Boraie /acaptured scenes of protesters on the streets in Cairo on Sunday, June 30, as demonstrations against the Egyptian president (and some from his supporters) clogged the city's streets. Egyptian iReporter and photographer Mohamed Boraie captured scenes of protesters on the streets in Cairo on Sunday, June 30, as demonstrations against the Egyptian president (and some from his supporters) clogged the city’s streets.

The atmosphere was very emotional, seeing all Egyptians from all [walks] of life, a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/Boraie' Mohamed Boraie/a said. Different areas of Cairo came along to call for President Morsy to step down.“The atmosphere was very emotional, seeing all Egyptians from all [walks] of life,” Mohamed Boraie said. “Different areas of Cairo came along to call for President Morsy to step down.”

iReporter and photographer a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/HasanAmin86'Hasan Amin/a captured these images June 30 in the crowd of protesters marching against Morsy in Cairo. It was positive. A lot of Egyptians went to protest for the first time, he said. iReporter and photographer Hasan Amin captured these images June 30 in the crowd of protesters marching against Morsy in Cairo. “It was positive. A lot of Egyptians went to protest for the first time,” he said.

They have faith that they can change [things] and that their fate is in their hands, a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/HasanAmin86'Hasan Amin/a said. The crowds, he said, were huge, and gathered all around the city's presidential palace, metro stations and streets.“They have faith that they can change [things] and that their fate is in their hands,” Hasan Amin said. The crowds, he said, were huge, and gathered all around the city’s presidential palace, metro stations and streets.

a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/Maialaa1990'Mai Alaa Kheder/a told CNN, People from all ages are coming from everywhere. It is safe, and the helicopters of the army are above us.Mai Alaa Kheder told CNN, “People from all ages are coming from everywhere. It is safe, and the helicopters of the army are above us.”


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Are you in Egypt? Send us your experiences, but please stay safe.

(CNN) — Demands. Prayers. Chants. Exhortations. Reflections. As Egypt reels from protest to protest, for many Egyptians it has never been more important to get message out about why they are on the streets — to each other, to the media, to any opposing side.

The country has been rocked in recent days by protesters demanding the resignation of former President Mohamed Morsy, with demonstrations at times threatening to spiral out of control as the pro- and anti-government sides clash violently, at times fatally, over the country’s young democracy.

The protests are the latest to wrack the country in what has proved a dramatic, often bloody, two years since the country’s 2011 revolution ousted former President Hosni Mubarak. Morsy was elected in Egypt’s first democratic elections a year later, but since then critics say he has become increasingly authoritarian, while the country’s economy continues to falter. This crisis has led to many of his supporters amongst the poor and middle class to become disaffected, analysts say.

Who is Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsy?

Those opposed to Morsy are a broad group, from youth groups and political coalitions to average citizens and Mubarak loyalists keen to return to power. CNN spoke to four anti-Morsy protesters about why they were on the streets, what they are demanding, and where they see their country heading.

Scores of Egyptians have contacted CNN through iReport — overwhelmingly representing the anti-Morsy faction. Their responses ranged from excitement, to trepidation, to optimism. But all shared one determination — change for Egypt.

Here’s what they had to say, in their own words.

The veteran

Ahmed Raafat

Ahmed Raafat has documented the streets of Cairo since the early days of the country’s 2011 revolution. He is 23 and a petroleum engineer and photographer.

I protest because I have a dream of changing Egypt for the better. I think this country deserves better than this. Nothing has changed since the beginning of the revolution.

Dramatic photos, videos from iReport capture Egypt’s crisis

I’ve seen many people of my age and social background falling during our fight for freedom. I still remember carrying them and having their blood on my hands. I don’t want their blood to go in vain.

When I stand beside thousands of people and we chant together, I feel free and strong. I’ve never had the chance to experience such feelings before the revolution. The feeling that you’re not alone makes you feel stronger.

[At present] the atmosphere of uncertainty makes me nervous. Not knowing how things will turn out makes me worry. I’m excited to see millions on the streets, but I have fears and concerns regarding the role of the military in the coming period. We suffered under military rule in the period following Mubarak’s resignation, and I don’t want to experience that again.

The documenter

Mohamed Boraie

Mohamed Boraie lives in Cairo and works in finance, as well as working as a photographer who has captured images of the protests. He is 27.

The main reason that I am protesting — this time — is that the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsy are not being inclusive. Morsy was appointing minsters and lead figures in the government that are exclusively from the Muslim Brotherhood [Islamist movement backing Morsy that has risen to power since the fall of Mubarak].

Opinion: Why Morsy deserves a chance

In addition, he could not restore law and order during the first year of presidency, not to mention his weak economic reforms that every Egyptian is currently facing.

Another personal reason for protesting is how religion is being used and manipulated by the Muslim Brotherhood in a country where there is a huge illiteracy rate. Such misuse of religion is allowing the exploitation of the population in terms of wealth, human rights and women’s participation in the work force.

Taking part in a protest feels like someone is getting back an ownership of [their] country. I believe that Egyptians are evolving politically very quickly, and they will not give up unless their demands are met.

I’m excited to see Egypt going through an Islamic state, failing and evolving very quickly to refuse such a state, [but] I’m nervous to see what is next.

The optimist

Maged Eskander

Maged Eskander is an architect who lives in Cairo. He is 38.

My family and I are out in the streets for the same reason we protested against the old regime — the only difference this time is the ruling party is much, much worse.

Who are the protesters?

[Protesting is] one of the best feelings you can [have] … you finally feel that Egypt is with you. You feel you are not alone; you get back the feeling of being proud to be Egyptian. Everybody in the marches is very happy, it’s like we already won the battle.

We will stay in the streets until he resigns or the military force [Morsy] to resign. I hope all political parties get united in the [transitional] period until we have a real president and government.

I’m just optimistic, happy, proud … and a little worried about the Muslim Brotherhood’s reaction but confident [we] will win.

The first timer

Marwan Osman

Marwan Osman is 25 and a software engineer who lives in Alexandria. He went out in the streets for the first time on June 30 amid the mass protests against Morsy’s government.

During the fuel crisis that started about a week ago, I witnessed long lines of cars waiting to get some fuel. People fought each other for a place in the lines. Every day the crisis is growing, and no action has been taken.

Amanpour: Egypt’s experiment with democracy

This event led me to imagine what will happen when more crises happen. The next one could be a food crisis — and this time, more people will die and the whole country could collapse because of those successive crises.

The current MB [government] does not have any idea how to rule the country correctly. They can’t manage the basic human needs like electricity and fuel. The economy is collapsing and not a single action [has been] taken to prevent or fix the situation.

I am considered one of the high middle-class people with high education and a respectable job. I don’t face most of the problems people suffer, [so] it’s amazing to share the experience [of protesting] with your country’s people.

We all want Morsy to step down and the Muslim Brotherhood party to leave the political scene, for now. Who will rule next is a debate between people, whether it’s the army or the liberals. But, for sure, we want a firm grip to save the country and the economy.

Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/03/world/irpt-egypt-protests-their-words/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/z3FRL8RdvzY/voices-from-cairos-streets

Voices from the streets of Cairo


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iReportera href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/CouclaRefaat' Alia Coucla Refaat/a captured this image of protesters demonstrating against former President Mohamed Morsy on Tuesday, July 2, on the streets of Cairo. The streets are full of chanting and love, she said. Men are being respectful to women, giving us our space to take part in this revolution.iReporter Alia Coucla Refaat captured this image of protesters demonstrating against former President Mohamed Morsy on Tuesday, July 2, on the streets of Cairo. “The streets are full of chanting and love,” she said. “Men are being respectful to women, giving us our space to take part in this revolution.”

iReporter a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/mgkab'Malak Kabbani/a sent in images from protests held July 2. She told CNN: The energy in Tahrir is very positive, the protests have been very peaceful all over Cairo and surrounding Egyptian states so far. iReporter Malak Kabbani sent in images from protests held July 2. She told CNN: “The energy in Tahrir is very positive, the protests have been very peaceful all over Cairo and surrounding Egyptian states so far.”

While photographing the protesters,a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/MahmoudGamal' Mahmoud Gamal/a felt as though there was a sense of rage within protesters. You could consider it a new wave of rage in this revolution, he said.While photographing the protesters, Mahmoud Gamal felt as though there was a sense of rage within protesters. “You could consider it a new wave of rage in this revolution,” he said.

I believe that the call for an early presidential election is fair enough, iReporter a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/MahmoudGamal'Mahmoud Gamal /asaid. “I believe that the call for an early presidential election is fair enough,” iReporter Mahmoud Gamal said.

Veteran iReporter and protester a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/arasquare'Ahmed Raafat/a captured images and videos of protesters demonstrating against Egypt's president on Monday, July 1. I'm not sure what's going to happen, but I think the situation will continue to escalate, he says.Veteran iReporter and protester Ahmed Raafat captured images and videos of protesters demonstrating against Egypt’s president on Monday, July 1. “I’m not sure what’s going to happen, but I think the situation will continue to escalate,” he says.

Egyptian iReporter and photographera href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/Boraie' Mohamed Boraie /acaptured scenes of protesters on the streets in Cairo on Sunday, June 30, as demonstrations against the Egyptian president (and some from his supporters) clogged the city's streets. Egyptian iReporter and photographer Mohamed Boraie captured scenes of protesters on the streets in Cairo on Sunday, June 30, as demonstrations against the Egyptian president (and some from his supporters) clogged the city’s streets.

The atmosphere was very emotional, seeing all Egyptians from all [walks] of life, a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/Boraie' Mohamed Boraie/a said. Different areas of Cairo came along to call for President Morsy to step down.“The atmosphere was very emotional, seeing all Egyptians from all [walks] of life,” Mohamed Boraie said. “Different areas of Cairo came along to call for President Morsy to step down.”

iReporter and photographer a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/HasanAmin86'Hasan Amin/a captured these images June 30 in the crowd of protesters marching against Morsy in Cairo. It was positive. A lot of Egyptians went to protest for the first time, he said. iReporter and photographer Hasan Amin captured these images June 30 in the crowd of protesters marching against Morsy in Cairo. “It was positive. A lot of Egyptians went to protest for the first time,” he said.

They have faith that they can change [things] and that their fate is in their hands, a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/HasanAmin86'Hasan Amin/a said. The crowds, he said, were huge, and gathered all around the city's presidential palace, metro stations and streets.“They have faith that they can change [things] and that their fate is in their hands,” Hasan Amin said. The crowds, he said, were huge, and gathered all around the city’s presidential palace, metro stations and streets.

a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/people/Maialaa1990'Mai Alaa Kheder/a told CNN, People from all ages are coming from everywhere. It is safe, and the helicopters of the army are above us.Mai Alaa Kheder told CNN, “People from all ages are coming from everywhere. It is safe, and the helicopters of the army are above us.”


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Are you in Egypt? Send us your experiences, but please stay safe.

(CNN) — Demands. Prayers. Chants. Exhortations. Reflections. As Egypt reels from protest to protest, for many Egyptians it has never been more important to get message out about why they are on the streets — to each other, to the media, to any opposing side.

The country has been rocked in recent days by protesters demanding the resignation of former President Mohamed Morsy, with demonstrations at times threatening to spiral out of control as the pro- and anti-government sides clash violently, at times fatally, over the country’s young democracy.

The protests are the latest to wrack the country in what has proved a dramatic, often bloody, two years since the country’s 2011 revolution ousted former President Hosni Mubarak. Morsy was elected in Egypt’s first democratic elections a year later, but since then critics say he has become increasingly authoritarian, while the country’s economy continues to falter. This crisis has led to many of his supporters amongst the poor and middle class to become disaffected, analysts say.

Who is Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsy?

Those opposed to Morsy are a broad group, from youth groups and political coalitions to average citizens and Mubarak loyalists keen to return to power. CNN spoke to four anti-Morsy protesters about why they were on the streets, what they are demanding, and where they see their country heading.

Scores of Egyptians have contacted CNN through iReport — overwhelmingly representing the anti-Morsy faction. Their responses ranged from excitement, to trepidation, to optimism. But all shared one determination — change for Egypt.

Here’s what they had to say, in their own words.

The veteran

Ahmed Raafat

Ahmed Raafat has documented the streets of Cairo since the early days of the country’s 2011 revolution. He is 23 and a petroleum engineer and photographer.

I protest because I have a dream of changing Egypt for the better. I think this country deserves better than this. Nothing has changed since the beginning of the revolution.

Dramatic photos, videos from iReport capture Egypt’s crisis

I’ve seen many people of my age and social background falling during our fight for freedom. I still remember carrying them and having their blood on my hands. I don’t want their blood to go in vain.

When I stand beside thousands of people and we chant together, I feel free and strong. I’ve never had the chance to experience such feelings before the revolution. The feeling that you’re not alone makes you feel stronger.

[At present] the atmosphere of uncertainty makes me nervous. Not knowing how things will turn out makes me worry. I’m excited to see millions on the streets, but I have fears and concerns regarding the role of the military in the coming period. We suffered under military rule in the period following Mubarak’s resignation, and I don’t want to experience that again.

The documenter

Mohamed Boraie

Mohamed Boraie lives in Cairo and works in finance, as well as working as a photographer who has captured images of the protests. He is 27.

The main reason that I am protesting — this time — is that the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsy are not being inclusive. Morsy was appointing minsters and lead figures in the government that are exclusively from the Muslim Brotherhood [Islamist movement backing Morsy that has risen to power since the fall of Mubarak].

Opinion: Why Morsy deserves a chance

In addition, he could not restore law and order during the first year of presidency, not to mention his weak economic reforms that every Egyptian is currently facing.

Another personal reason for protesting is how religion is being used and manipulated by the Muslim Brotherhood in a country where there is a huge illiteracy rate. Such misuse of religion is allowing the exploitation of the population in terms of wealth, human rights and women’s participation in the work force.

Taking part in a protest feels like someone is getting back an ownership of [their] country. I believe that Egyptians are evolving politically very quickly, and they will not give up unless their demands are met.

I’m excited to see Egypt going through an Islamic state, failing and evolving very quickly to refuse such a state, [but] I’m nervous to see what is next.

The optimist

Maged Eskander

Maged Eskander is an architect who lives in Cairo. He is 38.

My family and I are out in the streets for the same reason we protested against the old regime — the only difference this time is the ruling party is much, much worse.

Who are the protesters?

[Protesting is] one of the best feelings you can [have] … you finally feel that Egypt is with you. You feel you are not alone; you get back the feeling of being proud to be Egyptian. Everybody in the marches is very happy, it’s like we already won the battle.

We will stay in the streets until he resigns or the military force [Morsy] to resign. I hope all political parties get united in the [transitional] period until we have a real president and government.

I’m just optimistic, happy, proud … and a little worried about the Muslim Brotherhood’s reaction but confident [we] will win.

The first timer

Marwan Osman

Marwan Osman is 25 and a software engineer who lives in Alexandria. He went out in the streets for the first time on June 30 amid the mass protests against Morsy’s government.

During the fuel crisis that started about a week ago, I witnessed long lines of cars waiting to get some fuel. People fought each other for a place in the lines. Every day the crisis is growing, and no action has been taken.

Amanpour: Egypt’s experiment with democracy

This event led me to imagine what will happen when more crises happen. The next one could be a food crisis — and this time, more people will die and the whole country could collapse because of those successive crises.

The current MB [government] does not have any idea how to rule the country correctly. They can’t manage the basic human needs like electricity and fuel. The economy is collapsing and not a single action [has been] taken to prevent or fix the situation.

I am considered one of the high middle-class people with high education and a respectable job. I don’t face most of the problems people suffer, [so] it’s amazing to share the experience [of protesting] with your country’s people.

We all want Morsy to step down and the Muslim Brotherhood party to leave the political scene, for now. Who will rule next is a debate between people, whether it’s the army or the liberals. But, for sure, we want a firm grip to save the country and the economy.

Article source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/03/world/irpt-egypt-protests-their-words/index.html?eref=edition

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewsRipplesWeb/~3/AgrIxu4A9Kw/voices-from-the-streets-of-cairo

Lamptron CW611 Review

Lamptron CW611 Review – Introduction

Manufacturer: Lamptron
UK Price (as reviewed): £60 (inc. VAT)
US Price (as reviewed): TBC

It’s easy to overlook the humble fan controller these days. Motherboard-based fan control is improving with every generation, and several motherboard manufacturers now support 3-pin and 4-pin fans as well as sporting automatic fan control and thermal probes. However, just like many consider the right of passage to being a true petrolhead is owning an Alfa Romeo, the same could be said of PC enthusiasts and fan controllers.

In many ways they are the original mod, harking back to the days before large, slow spinning fans when it was all we could do just to keep our PCs from sounding like jet engines. Things may have moved on somewhat since then but there’s still plenty of wiggle room to find that perfect balance of airflow and noise. Quite simply, it’s still the case that fan controllers are among the most cost-effective ways to reduce the noise your PC makes, and they look snazzy too.

“But what if I watercool my PC?” We hear you ask. Well that’s where the Lamptron CW611 comes in.

Lamptron CW611 Review Lamptron CW611 Review - IntroductionLamptron CW611 Review Lamptron CW611 Review - Introduction
Click to enlarge

With 36W available on each channel, you’re not just able to control fans but water-cooling pumps too. If you’ve owned a variable speed pump like Laing’s D5 Vario, you’ll know how much quieter they can be by running them on their lowest speed with little or no difference in temperatures too.

Lamptron CW611 Review Lamptron CW611 Review - Introduction

The CW611 has six channels and each can perform one of several tasks. You can hook up a 3-pin pump, 3-pin fans or even a flowmeter, although the latter is obviously for display purposes only. Connecting a flowmeter allows you to display the flow rate in either litres or gallons per hour and with the per-channel alarm function, you can tell the CW611 to sound an alarm based on the flow rate.

Lamptron CW611 Review Lamptron CW611 Review - Introduction

Included are six 70CM 2-pin thermal probes, albeit without any adhesive pads, which attach to a bank of headers on the rear of the CW611 – you can of course also use coolant temperature probes to base you fan control on coolant temperature too. Six 50CM 3-pin fan cables are also included and connect to the six 3-pin headers at the rear that span the top of the main PCB. For power, you’ll need a spare 4-pin molex connector but Lamptron has also thrown in a braided molex extender which is a nice touch.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/OTRw8QyPLbM/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/Mc33SEgalzo/

This 2014 Corvette Stingray only costs $275

2014 Corvette Power Wheels car

Face-melting Power Wheels speeds await you.


(Credit:
Fisher-Price)

When it come to iconic American cars, few vehicles can touch the sinuous toughness exuded by the Corvette Stingray. Chevrolet is preparing to reintroduce a new version of the Stingray, leaving countless speed-loving petrol-heads breathless at the idea. Most of those people won’t be able to either afford or justify buying the car, but they can still live vicariously through their children when Fisher-Price releases a Power Wheels version later this year.

The real full-size 2014 Stingray goes from 0-60 in less than 4 seconds. The battery-powered Power Wheels Stingray goes from 0-6 in just 4 seconds. When it arrives, it will be the fastest Power Wheels available. Those are face-searing speeds that will suck the wind right out your lungs and leave you flushed with exhilaration…if you’re 3 years old.

This may be the best way to prepare your children in advance for a midlife crisis. They won’t have to buy red convertibles when they hit 40 because they’ve already been there and done that. They’ve already experienced the thrill of a Stingray at a tender young age. It’s possible no other
car will live up to that original chrome-wheeled beast, but that’s just the risk you take as a parent.

The Power Wheels Corvette will be available in September, but preorders start on July 1. Besides the iconic red color, the child-size car will also be available in Barbie pink.

While all the other kids are tootling around in underpowered Beetles and Barbie Escalades, your tyke will be tearing up the playground, like a future Jeremy Clarkson, behind the wheel of an American legend (that was probably made in China). Just $275 is a small price to pay to put your beloved child in the same Corvette-owning company as Burt Reynolds, Sharon Stone, and astronaut Alan Shepard.

Power Wheels Stingray from behind

The shiny new Stingray has chrome wheels.


(Credit:
Fisher-Price)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/SrJQVEm3Niw/