Archive

Posts Tagged ‘power’

Intel upgrades Bay Trail NUC to Celeron N2830

Intel upgrades Bay Trail NUC to Celeron N2830

Intel’s NUC DN2820FYKH kit is to get a free upgrade to the bug-fixed and speed-bumped Celeron N2830, as the months-old N2820 gets discontinued.


Intel has officially discontinued its Celeron N2820 Bay Trail chip mere months after launch, replacing it in its own NUC DN2820FYKH Kit with the faster and bug-fixed Celeron N2830.

A low-cost entry-level model based on the Bay Trail architecture, the NUC DN2820FYKH Kit bundled Intel’s 7.5W Celeron N2820 processor with a NUC motherboard and casing, offering two cores running at 2.13GHz – 2.39GHz burst – in a low-power, small-footprint system. The launch wasn’t without its problems, however, with reports of driver glitches and issues with the on-chip USB controller causing early adopters no small amount of heartache.

Some of those flaws, it would appear, have been traced back to the processor’s design. Despite only launching late last year, Intel announced back in February that the chip was to be officially discontinued. In all cases, manufacturers who are currently receiving the Celeron N2820 were told to move to the N2830. A bug-fixed successor launched early this year, the Celeron N2830 boosts the clockspeed slightly to 2.16GHz – 2.41GHz burst – while retaining the 7.5W thermal design profile (TDP) and 4.5W scenario design power (SDP) of its predecessor, along with the $107 recommended price tag. The memory controller is also modified, adding support for DDR3L-1333 low-power modules.

The move to discontinue the months-old chip is to have an impact on the recently-launched NUC DN2820FYKH Kit: silent cooling specialist site FanlessTech was the first to notice the move in an official Product Change Notification sent to Intel’s customers earlier this week, confirming that the N2830 would be the new standard chip for the DN2820FYKH.

Those in the market for a low-power Bay Trail NUC are warned: Intel has confirmed that it is holding inventory of the earlier N2820 models, and will deplete said inventory before shipping the upgraded revision to its customers. Coupled with retailers own stock, it could be a while before the upgraded NUC kits actually start filtering into customers’ hands.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/60K9rvcHtg0/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/1te8VrvxGog/

EVGA launches SuperNOVA G2, P2 sleeved cable sets

EVGA launches SuperNOVA G2, P2 sleeved cable sets

EVGA’s pre-sleeved cables for its SuperNOVA P2 and G2 PSUs are undeniably attractive, but at €64 a premium upgrade option.


EVGA has announced the launch of a new accessory for the modder in a hurry: pre-sleeved cable sets for its SuperNOVA G2 and P2 modular power supply families.

Launched in Europe this week via the official EVGA webshop, the cable bundles are initially available in a choice of four colours: black, red, blue and white. Each cable set includes a single 24-pin ATX cable, two 4+4 pin EPS12V cables, four 6+2 pin PCIe cables, two 6+2 and 6-pin PCIe cables, four SATA cables with three connectors each, one four-pin Molex cable with three connectors, and a single combination cable with two four-pin Molex connectors and a floppy connector.

Designed for use with the company’s SuperNova G2 and P2 modular power supplies, the selling point for the cable bundles is the sleeving. Each wire is individually sleeved in braided cord, coloured to match the overall theme of your rig. Each sleeve reaches right down into the connectors at both ends, with no unsightly heatshrink poking out to spoil the effect.

Sadly, the visual appeal of the cables comes at a cost: each cable set is priced at €64 (around £53), and at present the company has no plans to make smaller sets or individual cables available for those who don’t need a full complement of wires in their rigs. Compared to rival Corsair, which charges around £27 for a sleeved cable upgrade kit for its HX and TXM modular PSUs, that’s a hefty fee.

The sleeved cable kits are available in all four colours now from the official EVGA webshop.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/UC03BW3SZQ0/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/YUkLgbCSbvw/

AMD Athlon 5350 (Kabini) Review

AMD Athlon 5350 (Kabini) Review

Manufacturer: AMD
UK price (as reviewed): £40.72
US price (as reviewed): $63.99

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

There was some interesting news regarding AMD recently. Financially, it recorded some significant losses throughout 2013, which can arguably be traced all the way back to Intel’s launch of its Core architecture and AMD’s somewhat ill-fated Phenom. However, while it hasn’t really clawed back any significant ground in the high performance desktop CPU market, the APU arena is a very different story.

The case for budget gaming systems is pretty strong, and Kaveri and Richland (think A10-7850K and A10-6800K) have strengthened the idea that there are playable frame rates to be had below your typical budget CPU and cheap discrete GPU setup.

AMD has seen enhanced sales of GPUs thanks to cryptocurrency mining (not forgetting that the company is also in a fairly equal fight with Nvidia when it comes to frame rates too), and it also has fingers in plenty of next-gen console pies. Its Q1 2014 net income of -$20m is actually a lot better than what we’ve seen recently – the same quarter last year, for example, saw its net income at -$146m.

Things are arguably looking up for AMD, then, and with Intel’s inferior but ever-increasing graphics performance on its CPUs, with Kabini, AMD’s latest APU, it is looking to cement its dominance at the extreme budget end of the market, and fend off competition from budget Intel CPUs.

AMD Athlon 5350 (Kabini) ReviewAMD Athlon 5350 (Kabini) Review
So where exactly does Kabini fit in? Well, AMD wanted to be clear here – this isn’t a 1080p gaming setup, nor is Kabini going to be competing with Pentiums or Core i3′s in 2D performance stakes either. It’s not even really a cut down version of Kaveri – Kabini is essentially a low power desktop version of its latest mobile and console-based silicon sporting up to four Jaguar cores along with a Radeon GPU portion – more on the technical side of things over the page.

As we reported here on the day of launch, Kabini is essentially AMD’s answer to Intel’s Bay Trail, which is found in some low-power Pentium, Celeron and Atom-based systems including NUCs amongst other things. Steam OS, HTPCs and generic budget systems all come into play here, especially as Kabini APUs also sport Radeon graphics, and this market is precisely what AMD is aiming at.

AMD Athlon 5350 (Kabini) Review
It’s certainly lucrative given the sheer volumes involved, especially in the home/office PC side of things. However, something that’s really raised some eyebrows is the cost of the APUs and indeed their counterpart Socket AM1 motherboards. The latter are currently available for as little as £20, and the top-end APU that we’re looking at here today, the Athlon 5350, only costs £40 with the low-end Sempron 2650 retailing for just £24. Throw in a budget PSU, 4GB of RAM and a mini-ITX case such as Cooler Master’s Elite 130, and you’re looking at a complete base unit price of no more than £150 – something Intel simply cannot match, at least if you’re buying up-to-date gear.

AMD has cited a need from developing countries for a low-cost offering and price-wise it’s certainly met that, but where the new Socket AM1 also surprised us when we first heard about it, is that it’s socketed – not embedded like its predecessors. The reason for this, again according to AMD, is to offer a modicum of future proofing for the new socket but also to allow some flexibility when it comes to hardware choice, even if at launch there are only four models to choose from.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/yexc35NwQho/1

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/zmcFqRoO-G4/

Novena laptop gets new stretch goals

Novena laptop gets new stretch goals

Andrew ‘Bunnie’ Huang has added stretch goals to his crowd-funded Novena laptop, including GPIO break-out boards and software defined radio modules.


Andrew ‘Bunnie’ Huang has announced new stretch-goals for his crowd-funded Novena open hardware laptop project, currently approaching 80 per cent of its $250,000 goal with 24 days left on the clock.

First unveiled in December 2012 as a very early prototype, and given the name Novena in January this year, the project aims to produce an ARM-based laptop with features designed to appeal to the hobbyist. With a fully open hardware design and running entirely on open source software – no binary blobs required to boot, Bunnie has promised – the design includes a quad-core ARM chip with a Xilinx Spartan 6 field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as a co-processor.

Earlier this month, Bunnie launched a crowd-funding drive designed to bring the first Novena models to production. With 77 per cent of the ambitious $250,000 goal raised with 24 days still to go, Huang has now announced stretch goals for the project – and they include some impressive add-ons.

First, a heartfelt “thank you” to all those who have backed our crowdfunding campaign to bring Novena-powered open computing devices to the world,‘ wrote Bunnie of the project’s success so far. ‘One excellent outcome ofthe campaign is a lot of people have reached out to us to extend the Novena platform and make it even better, and so we’re offering a diverse range of stretch goals to provide an even better open laptop for all walks of users.

If the pot reaches $300,000, Bunnie has promised to hire deevloper Jon Nettleton to develop fully open-source accelerated 2D and 3D graphics drivers for the Novena; $350,000 and all hardware shipments will include a general-purpose breakout board with 16 outputs and eight inputs connected to the FPGA with user-space drivers for use in Linux; a $400,000 pot will add a ROMulator breakout board, allowing the Novena to be used to capture and modify traffic from ROM chips; if the project doubles its goal to $500,000 or has more than 200 backers picking the desktop, laptop or limited edition heirloom Novena hardware, buyers will get a bundled MyriadRF software-defined radio (SDR) module.

Details of the stretch goals are available on the project’s CrowdSupply page.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/-fa0D-0VNn0/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/WG7Io3AzWXM/

Fractal Design Arc XL Review

Fractal Design Arc XL Review

Manufacturer: Fractal Design
UK price (as reviewed):
£101.41 (inc VAT)
US price (as reviewed): $129.99 (ex Tax)

The Arc line of Fractal Design cases fall into its performance category. As such, having plenty of airflow is key, as is the ability to install lots of high-end components and water-cooling gear. We’ve been thoroughly impressed by the latest cases in the range, the midi-tower Arc Midi R2 and the micro-ATX Arc Mini R2. With the Arc XL, Fractal has now also seen fit to make an Arc case suitable for those with larger motherboards and components, something it has also done previously with the low-noise Define range of cases.

*Fractal Design Arc XL Review Fractal Design Arc XL Review *Fractal Design Arc XL Review Fractal Design Arc XL Review
Click to enlarge
The chassis certainly lives up to the XL in its name. At over 570mm tall it’s capable of housing both E-ATX and XL-ATX motherboards, and is of a similar size to the Corsair Obsidian 750D. As expected, it sports the classic Fractal black and white colour scheme, with white PCI brackets and fan blades. It’s also very much an Arc chassis, with the hefty mesh sections on the roof and front panel along with the large, tinted side panel window ensuring aesthetic uniformity throughout the range. Build quality is of the usual high standards – there’s a little bend to the side panels but that’s just a result of them being so large, and elsewhere the plastic and steel exterior is solid and sturdy.

*Fractal Design Arc XL Review Fractal Design Arc XL Review
Click to enlarge
The front mesh section clips on and off with ease thanks to a pair of push pins, and as usual it’s backed by dust filtering material too. Removing it reveals a duo of 140mm/120mm fan mounts, with a single 140mm Silent Series R2 fan mounted in the top one. The design allows you to install fans here without popping off the entire front panel, which is handy. However, above this section are the four covers for the optical drive bays, which do require front panel removal to access.

The I/O panel is located on the roof, and comprises four USB ports (two being USB 3), dual audio jacks, power and reset buttons and a fan control switch, which has 5V, 7V and 12V settings and can control up to three fans. The action of the power button is fine, but the reset one is too small to use your fingers with – this could become annoying in troubleshooting situations but it does mean you’ll never accidentally press it when fumbling for a USB port or the like.

*Fractal Design Arc XL Review Fractal Design Arc XL Review *Fractal Design Arc XL Review Fractal Design Arc XL Review
Click to enlarge
Practically the entire roof is formed from another mesh and dust filter combination. Unlike the front one this cannot be clipped in and out of place, but Fractal recommends simply cleaning it with a hoover while it’s still attached. Beneath it there is room for three 120mm or 140mm fans, with another 140mm Silent Series R2 fan included in the furthest back mount. This is complemented by the case’s third and final fan (the same model), which is fitted as a rear exhaust.

Moving to the bottom of the Arc XL, we find a set of feet that lift the case some way of the ground, and which are fitted with rubber rings to give it excellent grip on all surfaces. A slide out dust filter is fitted here, and it protects both the PSU and the last of the case’s fan mounts, a 140mm/120mm one on the case floor. Unlike many cases, the filter here is relatively easy to replace without having to tilt the case on its side.

Specifications

  • Dimensions (mm) 232 x 552 x 572 (W x D x H)
  • Material Steel, plastic
  • Available colours Black
  • Weight 13.8kg
  • Front panel Power, reset, 2 x USB 3, 2 x USB 2, stereo, microphone, fan controller
  • Drive bays 4 x external 5.25in, 8 x internal 3.5in/2.5in, 2 x internal 2.5in
  • Form factor(s) E-ATX, XL-ATX, ATX, micro-ATX, mini-ITX
  • Cooling 2 x 140mm/120mm front fan mounts (1 x 140mm fan included), 1 x 140mm/120mm rear fan mount (140mm fan included), 3 x 140mm/120mm or 1 x 180mm and 1 x 140mm/120mm roof fan mounts (1 x 140mm fan included), 1 x 140mm/120mm bottom fan mount (fan not included)
  • CPU cooler clearance 180mm
  • Maximum graphics card length 330mm (480mm without HDD cage)
  • Extras Removable dust filters, triple speed fan controller

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/-0KOqiLNvQ8/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/ERrZIjzzTzU/

HummingBoard, Banana Pi take on the Raspberry Pi

HummingBoard, Banana Pi take on the Raspberry Pi

The Banana Pi pictured, and HummingBoard SBCs offer pin-compatibility with Raspberry Pi accessories but significantly improved features and performance.


The success of the Raspberry Pi project has kick-started interest in low-cost Linux-powered single-board computers, but it has been surprisingly free of clone designs – until now.

Unlike rival development platforms such as the Olimex OLinuXino family or the popular Arduino microcontroller, the Raspberry Pi is not open hardware. Its design is locked-down and proprietary, and its principle components – namely the Broadcom BCM2835 system-on-chip (SoC) processor – not available in small quantities or without signing restrictive non-disclosure agreements. This may have contributed to a lack of compatible clones appearing on the market since its launch more than two years ago – until now, with two companies announcing Pi-compatible creations featuring considerably improved specifications: the HummingBoard and the Banana Pi.

First, the HummingBoard. Created by Solid-Run, the company behind the ultra-compact CuBox product line, the HummingBoard boasts the same features, design and layout as the Raspberry Pi – right down to the 26-pin general-purpose input-output (GPIO) header at the top-left of the board, which is pin-compatible with existing Pi accessories. Unlike the underpowered single-core 700MHz ARMv6 processor of the Pi, the HummingBoard boasts a quad-core 1GHz Freescale i.MX6 chip, 2GB of RAM – four times that of the Pi – and integrated Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. Additional enhancements over the Pi include an upgrade to gigabit Ethernet, an on-board real-time clock module, and an infra-red receiver.

The Banana Pi goes a step further. Created by OSSUG Company, The Banana Pi again duplicates the layout and footprint of the Raspberry Pi and includes both the 26-pin GPIO header and the smaller P5 header of its established rival. Although its 1GB of RAM and dual-core AllWinner A20 processor can’t match the performance of the HummingBoard, the Banana Pi boasts an on-board SATA connector with 5V power output for mass storage. The board also includes gigabit Ethernet, an infra-red receiver, three on-board buttons and, interestingly, a microphone.

Thus far, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has been slow to offer an upgraded version of its award-winning single-board computer. The initial Raspberry Pi Model B was succeeded by a Revision 2 design which added the P5 connector and doubled the memory to 512MB but retained the slow single-core ARMv6 processor, while the Model A is a cut-down version which drops to a single USB port and loses the Ethernet networking chip. Its most recent product, the Compute Module, still uses the outdated BCM2835 chip – leaving the market open for Pi-compatible devices like the Banana Pi and HummingBoard that can offer buyers higher performance and more features.

Pricing for the HummingBoard has yet to be confirmed, with the Banana Pi available on import from Chinese resellers for $59 (around £35, a mere £7 more than a Raspberry Pi Model B.)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/q9edVgbnKnY/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/Md0etbHOUK8/

Cryorig announces ITX-compatible C1 cooler

Cryorig announces ITX-compatible C1 cooler

The Cryorig C1, unlike its twin-fan tower predecessor the R1, is designed for space-restricted ITX systems.


Cooling start-up Cryorig has announced its second product, the top-down Cryorig C1 CPU cooler for ITX and micro-ATX systems, has entered mass production ahead of a June launch.

Cryorig entered the cooling market late last year with the Cryorig R1 twin-fan tower cooler. Founded by former employees of well-known cooling brands including Phanteks, Prolimatech and Thermalright, the company is based in Taiwan and promises considerable engineering prowess – hidden, sadly, behind a cavalcade of buzzwords and registered trademarks, from the DirectCompress Soldering technique for attaching the heatpipes to the cooling fins to the Jet Fin Acceleration System that sees the gap between the fins narrow as the air travels through the heatsink.

The Cryorig C1 is, at first glance, more of the same: the Jet Fin Acceleration System is present and correct, while the nickel-plated baseplate features six copper heatpipes connected in what the company calls its Heatpipe Convex-Align technology – another trademark, naturally.

Where the C1 differs from the R1 is in its overall design. Rather than targeting larger cases with room for tower coolers, the C1 boasts a top-down design suitable for the cramped conditions of an ITX chassis. ‘With the increase of APUs and enthusiast-level ITX mainboards and components, ITX systems are no longer limited to under-powered components like they used to be,‘ claimed Alex Wang, Cryorig co-founder and chief manufacturing engineer, of his company’s second product. ‘ITX systems now are housing high-performance, high-TDP CPUs and GPUs. Cooling these crucial components is an even greater challenge in these tight spaces.

The C1 is a mere 74mm in height, with an overall size of 144.5mm x 140mm, and comes bundled with a 13mm-thick 140mm PWM-controlled fan. As with the R1, the gap between the fins differs from the top to the bottom: a 1.8mm gap near the fan narrows to 1.4mm closer to the baseplate, which Cryorig claims accelerates the removal of hot air. Full support is promised for all common Intel and AMD socket types, with the claimed ability to cool chips of up to a 140W thermal design profile (TDP) and a six-year warranty when registered via the company’s website.

Pricing for the Cryorig C1 has yet to be confirmed, with the company planning to release stock to UK retailers in June. More details are available on the official product page.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/vkdw9fI7LN4/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/GXrM-iVneIk/

AMD investors positive despite $20M quarterly loss

AMD investors positive despite $20M quarterly loss

AMD’s Q1 2014 financial report shows a drop back into the red with a $20M loss, although investors seem bullish on the company’s future.


AMD’s most recent earnings report has investors impressed, with the company’s stock price rising almost 12 per cent on news of $1.4 billion in sales – despite an overall loss of $20 million for the first quarter of its financial year.

AMD’s quarterly earnings call this week announced $1.4 billion in revenue for Q1 2014, an impressive rise of 28 per cent year-on-year at a time when the global PC market is continuing to shrink – albeit slower than previously. While the quarter-on-quarter shrinkage of 12 per cent might seem like bad news, that’s comparing heavier sales in the run-up to Christmas to the post-Christmas slump; a sequential dip at this time is always to be expected.

A gross profit margin of just 35 per cent, indicative of AMD’s push towards the lower end of the market in CPUs and strong competition from rival Nvidia in GPUs, led to overall operating income of $49 million for the quarter; not enough, sadly, to prevent a loss of $20 million overall. With AMD ending the last quarter on an $89 million profit, that’s a blow – although one significantly less strong than the whopping $146 million loss the company made in the same quarter last year.

AMD continued our momentum by building on the solid foundation we set in the second half of 2013, further transforming the company,‘ claimed AMD president and chief executive Rory Read during the call with press, investors and analysts. ‘Backed by our powerful x86 processor cores and hands-down best graphics experiences, we achieved 28 percent revenue growth from the year-ago quarter. We are well positioned to continue to grow profitably as we diversify our business and enable our customers to drive change and win.

The company’s results show that the PC market slump, while slowing, is continuing to have an impact: AMD’s Computing Solutions business unit’s revenue dropped eight per cent quarter-on-quarter and 12 per cent year-on-year, due to a drop in shipments. Its operating loss, however, was a mere $3 million; down from $7 million last quarter and a painful $39 million in the same quarter last year.

AMD’s Graphics and Visual Solutions business unit is the most interesting story, however: a 15 per cent drop in sequential shipments has been more than offset by an impressive 118 per cent increase year-on-year, attributed to the company’s deals to put semi-custom system-on-chip (SoC) processors in the Microsoft Xbox One and Sony PlayStation 4 consoles. Overall, the division made a $91 million profit for the year, down from $121 million last quarter when Microsoft and Sony purchased their console chips but up from just $16 million in the same quarter last year.

During the conference call, AMD’s Lisa Su, general manager of global business units, confirmed that the company is still in the design stages of a new semiconductor process node. ‘We are 28 [nanometre] this year, we have 20 nanometre in design, and then FinFET thereafter,‘ she claimed in response to an analyst query – suggesting that 20nm parts won’t be available in quantity until 2015 at the earliest, with the 3D FinFET transistor move – designed to compete with Intel’s Tri-Gate Transistor technology – likely to come the year after.

Su also had positive things to say about AMD’s foray into the low-power server market with Cambridge-based ARM’s IP. ‘There’s been a lot of customer interest around Seattle [chips], so certainly for the server guys, the hyper-scale guys and then even some adjacent markets, there’s good customer interest, claimed Su. ‘I’ll say the interest in the platform is quite high and it’s a major milestone for us to introduce our first 64-bit ARM chip into the market.

What we’re doing here is identifying this opportunity long before it has taken place,‘ added Read, ‘and we’re catching it just as the way it is forming. That’s the kind of innovation leadership that we really want to go after. This is going to be an important market over the next three, five years, and we have an opportunity to truly lead in this ARM server ecosystem, and take advantage of our ambidextrous capability. This is spot-on in the strategy.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/mkBO1nkbUQs/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/gs9ezcMdsTg/

Alpine Ridge Thunderbolt slide claims 40Gb/s performance

Alpine Ridge Thunderbolt slide claims 40Gb/s performance

Intel’s next-generation Thunderbolt chipset, Alpine Ridge, has been apparently leaked in a slide claiming half the power draw and 40Gb/s of peak throughput.


A leaked slide purporting to offer a glimpse of Intel’s upcoming Alpine Ridge Thunderbolt controller promises a significant speed boost over current-generation implementations, offering 40Gb/s throughput for connected devices.

Developed in partnership with Apple and featured as standard on the company’s computers, Intel’s Thunderbolt technology aims to offer a single cable type for all peripheral devices. In addition to high-bandwidth data connections, Thunderbolt offers PCI Express lanes and DisplayPort connectivity as well as carrying power to recharge portable devices.

The current Falcon Ridge Thunderbolt chipset offers 20Gb/s of throughput, double the 10Gb/s of first-generation parts and twice that of USB 3.0. A slide published to Chinese technology site VR-Zone claims that Alpine Ridge will result in another doubling of throughput, offering 40Gb/s of throughput and support for the PCI Express Generation 3 standard.

As well as doubling the peak throughput, the Alpine Ridge controller is claimed to run at half the power of its predecessor. The new chipset will also come with a new connector standard, reducing its height by 3mm to ensure compatibility with future ultra-thin portable devices. The new connector will support power transfer of up to 100W for rapid charging, the slide claims, while adapters will be available for backwards compatibility with existing Thunderbolt devices. Two Alpine Ridge SKUs are claimed for launch: a 4C version, which offers two ports and support for daisy-chaining of client devices; and the LP version, which offers just a single port and no daisy-chaining support.

Intel, as is usual for the company, has not commented on the slide to confirm or deny its authenticity, nor is it willing to discuss unannounced products.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/news/~3/0g4K-Vr1uUU/1


Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/NZxYgZ1DSzg/

Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review

Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review

Manufacturer: Nanoxia
UK price (as reviewed):
£64.99 (inc VAT)
US price (as reviewed): Currently unavailable

As the name suggests, the top priority of Nanoxia’s Deep Silence range of cases is noise reduction. While a bespoke water-cooling system can do wonders for your system’s noise output, cases designed specifically to contain noise are an easier and more financially realistic option for most people. The noise (or rather the lack thereof) of the Deep Silence 1 and Deep Silence 2 chassis certainly impresses, but cooling performance also takes a hit – a classic trade-off. We’re now looking at the Deep Silence 4 (Deep Silence 3 having apparently been skipped), which brings the now familiar design to the micro-ATX form factor for an attractive £65.

*Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review *Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review
Click to enlarge
The Deep Silence 4 is available in three different colours, and each one has a nice brushed metal effect on the plastic front section. Elsewhere, there’s little visual fanfare, but like the Fractal Design Define series the case is modest looking and refined. Build quality on the outside is good all round, and the feet have large rubber pads to contain vibrations, and they also provide the case with plenty of grip and clearance.

The Deep Silence 4 features a case door that occupies the top third of the front panel. Opening it up reveals the reset button and the two optical drive covers, which can easily be clipped in and out of place. You’ll also find an impressively powerful set of fan controllers for so small and cheap a case. Each of the two variable speed sliders can be used to control the speed of up to three fans each.

*Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review *Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review
Click to enlarge
While we can’t complain about the ability to control six fans, it’s a little odd given that you can sadly install just three to the chassis itself, including the two that are bundled with it. These 120mm Deep Silence models, which have green blades, are fitted in the front intake and rear exhaust positions. The third and final fan mount, which can take both 120mm and 140mm models, is found in the roof, as the two side panels and the floor of the case are devoid of any extra ones. While we understand that the Deep Silence 4 is designed for low noise, having such a limited ability to expand upon the default cooling is nonetheless disappointing.

The front intake pulls air in through small vents on the sides of the front panel, as well as a single larger one beneath it. It’s blocked off entirely at the front, however, so airflow from this fan is unlikely to be that high, even at full speed.

*Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review *Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Review
Click to enlarge
Thick, spongy material designed to suppress noise lines the inside of the front door. Sadly, the bottom section of the front has no door, but it too is backed by noise dampening material, as are both side panels and the roof. The roof even includes a foam-backed blanking plate for the single fan mount, which is excellent to see – your case will be quieter and protected from dust when you’re not using this mount. A slide out dust filter is also provided for the PSU, while the front fan has its own one too (though you’ll need to pop the front panel off to access it), meaning the Deep Silence 4 is fully shielded against dust.

The final thing of note on the case’s exterior is the front panel connections. There’s nothing special here, though with two USB 3 ports alongside a USB 2 one and the usual audio jacks, there’s easily enough for a £65 case.

Specifications

  • Dimensions (mm) 200 x 480 x 380 (W x D x H)
  • Material Steel, plastic
  • Available colours Black, anthracite (reviewed), white
  • Front panel Power, reset, 2 x USB 3, USB 2, stereo, microphone
  • Drive bays 2 x external 5.25in, 6 x internal 3.5in/2.5in, 1 x internal 2.5in
  • Form factor(s) Micro-ATX, mini-ITX
  • Cooling 1 x 120mm front fan mount (fan included), 1 x 120mm rear fan mount (fan included), 1 x 140mm/120mm roof fan mount (fan not included)
  • CPU cooler clearance 160mm
  • Maximum graphics card length 265mm (395mm without HDD cage)
  • Extras Dual channel variable speed fan control, removable dust filters

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/Ula2tkMFI7w/1

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/jAElZ_LCdsY/