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Posts Tagged ‘stuff’

Double Fine becomes third party publisher with Escape Goat 2

Double Fine becomes third party publisher with Escape Goat 2

The original Escape Goat was launched in 2011. Its sequel only started life as a high-res art experiment.


Indie studio Double Fine has entered the third party publishing game with the release of puzzle platformer Escape Goat 2.

The game, a follow up to 2011’s Escape Goat, originally started life as developer Ian Stocker of MagicalTimeBean was experimenting to see how the first game would look with higher resolution art.

’I never imagined it would come this far, launching along with a nod of approval and publishing support from Double Fine,’ said Stocker.

The Escape Goat series pits players in the hooves of a goat imprisoned in a dungeon for witchcraft and needing to escape.

The last part of the game’s development was completed from the Double Fine offices in San Francisco where MagicalTimeBean was allowed in to use the studio’s resources during the Indie Omega Jam.

‘It’s super rad to be surrounded by other independent developers who are making cool stuff and are passionate about what they are doing,’ said Double Fine senior publishing manager Greg Rice. ’I’m really glad we could help them out and hope we can do this with more developers in the future!’

Double Fine closes the announcement by offering a contact email address for other indie developers to get in touch with the studio and talk about other potential publishing partnerships.

Escape Goat 2 is currently available on Steam, The Humbe Store and Good Old Games with a 10% discount for its launch week. The title is compatible with Windows, Mac and Linux systems.

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Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GamingRipplesWeb/~3/CYc1moqdz-c/

Google: No, no. You’ve got Glass all wrong

It’s nothing, really. Just a nice idea.


(Credit:
Google/YouTube Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

Something I’ve learned over the last few years is that Google is always right.

It criticizes the NSA for snooping, when it quite happily crawls all over your e-mails. But it’s right, because it’s for your own good.

It pumps ads at you even when you’re writing e-mails, but it’s right to do so. Because these ads are far better than all the other ads you’ll see on the Web.

And then there’s
Google Glass, which Google insists isn’t a creepy, awkward intrusion into public and private life. So Google must be right.

Well, except that those who have so far resisted a Google chip being implanted into their brains still feel that Glass might be for the self-righteous, rather than the normal human being.

Of late, Google seems to have adopted a crouching posture, as the criticisms and humor have rained its way.

First, it issued a Do’s and Don’ts post — in which it asked its Glass Explorers not to behave like Glassholes. Yes, they needed to be told.

Now the company has published a lengthy post on Google+ titled “The Top 10 Google Glass Myths.

It’s a riotous little read that comes across as a miffed and haughty self-justification, masked as mealy mouthed modesty.

In essence, dear downtrodden Earthling, you’ve got Google Glass all wrong.

Sample 1: You think Glass is on all the time? Of course it isn’t. Its default is off, just like your phone. It only gives you stuff when you need it. “It’s designed to get you a bit of what you need just when you need it and then get you back to the people and things in life youcare about.”

And, as you’re doing that, please try to forget that you’re wearing a ridiculous Borgiastic pair of glasses that make the people you care about suspect you need sedation.

Sample 2: Glass Explorers aren’t technology-worshipping geeks. Apparently, they’re normal people like firefighters and, um, reporters who just like to play technology-worshipping geeks when they’re out in public.

Google’s version of this: “The one thing they have in common is that they see the potential for people to use technology in a way that helps them engage more with the world around them, rather than distract them from it.”

It’s hard to write when I’m slapping my forehead very hard, but isn’t the way to engage more with the world around you, to not keep looking up at the right-hand corner of your Borgiastic glasses?

Other areas in which Google would like to disabuse you include: Google Glass is a finished product (no, no); Google Glass does facial recognition (No, no. Well, not yet); Google Glass is the perfect surveillance device. (Gosh, no. There are far better ones. They’re just not made by Google.)

This allegedly myth-busting post ends where you really want it to: in a discussion about whether Glass marks the end of privacy.

Don’t be ridiculous, says Google. There’s simply a trend toward more and more cameras. That’s the way the world is going.

“In ten years there will be even more cameras, with or without Glass. 150+ years of cameras and eight years of YouTube are a good indicator of the kinds of photos and videos people capture — from our favorite cat videos to dramatic, perspective-changing looks at environmental destruction, government crackdowns, and everyday human miracles,” says the post.

Yes, humans are such positive, optimistic, freedom-fighting, cat-loving sorts. They never snoop on anyone. They never Scroogle or Microsnoop. They never pry and spy and plot and envy and loathe.

Well, at least not on the West Coast they don’t.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/FkUbV7Go10g/

Cubli cube robot demonstrates incredible balance

Cubli
(Credit:
(Screenshot by Michelle Starr/CNET Australia))

Some robots do something useful, like ordnance disposal. Some robots do something artistic, like produce music. Some are more interactive. And some robots are just danged cool.

On that note, we’ve recently stumbled across Cubli, a little cube-shaped robot made by Gajan Mohanarajah, Ph.D. candidate and research assistant at ETH Zurich. Cubli isn’t designed to build a wall or translate slime mold. Instead, it’s based on a very simple idea: “Can we build a 15-centimeter-sided cube that can jump up, balance on its corner, and walk across our desk using off-the-shelf motors, batteries, and electronic components?”

Balancing is not necessarily difficult to achieve (although it looks amazing); the trickiest part was in getting the cube to jump up from a resting position to a balancing position, since it releases a burst of energy to do so, and needed to be kept stable. The solution was to use momentum wheels, which are the same kind of flywheel used for altitude control in spacecraft.

These momentum wheels were then also used to help the cube balance by using the reaction torques‘ acceleration and deceleration.

“These torques are what the Cubli’s structure ‘feels’ when the three motors attached to it accelerate or decelerate the wheels,” Mohanarajah explained. “In fact, Cubli’s controller tries to minimise wheel velocities in addition to keeping the structure upright. This method is more reactive to external disturbances and reduces vibrations and sensor noise.”

The resulting robot is able to jump from a resting position to balancing on an edge, then a corner; and it can “walk” by jumping up, balancing on an edge and falling onto another side of the cube, effectively rolling along. It’s really cool stuff, and we’d love to have one of our own just to play with.

(Source: Crave Australia via Robohub)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/83F4W9SWexE/

‘Game of Thrones’ math: How many dragons could a dire wolf eat?

Definitely cooler than a condor, Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons would nonetheless taste pretty good to a dire wolf.


(Credit:
Video screenshot by Michael Franco/CNET)

Possible spoilers ahead if you’re not through with the third season: With the fourth season of “Game of Thrones” imminent, there are a lot of questions in the air (especially if, like me, you haven’t read the books). Will the khaleesi finally make it to Westeros to capture the Iron Throne? Will the Starks in the diaspora ever find each other again? Will winter ever actually come? And will someone finally beat the royal stuffing out of Joffrey?

But I’ve been giving thought to a particularly pesky question that I’m sure hordes of fans are dying to know. (OK, probably not, but it’s certainly a question that’s crossed my random-factoid-focused science brain). It began when I started thinking about what would happen if Robb Stark ever met up with Daenerys Targaryen (which of course, can never happen now with Robb being all dead and whatnot). While some might think my ponderings might have turned to the beautiful offspring that surely would have resulted if those two ever got together, I had a much different question in mind: How many Targaryen dragons could a Stark dire wolf eat per year if it got its fangs on them? To find out, I embarked on some very scientific research.


dire wolf

Robb Stark with his dire wolf Grey Wind. Looks hungry, doesn’t it?


(Credit:
Video screenshot by Michael Franco/CNET )

To begin my investigation, I grabbed the screenshot you see to the right from a YouTube clip featuring Robb Stark. In this particular scene, he’s got his dire wolf, Grey Wind, next to him in an effort to scare the piss out of Jaime Lannister. (If you ask me, it worked. But I digress.) Robb Stark is played by actor Richard Madden, who, I found out thanks to a quick Google search, is 5 feet 11 inches tall.

To determine the actor’s approximate inseam height, I reached out to Max Berlinger, a men’s fashion writer for Esquire magazine. “Honestly, I have no way to gauge this. I wish I could be more helpful, but this is a puzzle,” Berlinger said. However, he did say that if he had to make a guess — and a guess only — he’d put it at 32 inches, which is pretty standard for a man of Madden’s size. Because I am the same height as Madden (and share a certain rugged set of good looks as him, but I again I digress), and have a 32-inch inseam, I went with that. Science at its best.

So if Robb Stark’s inseam is 32 inches and the wolf is standing a little more than a foot above that, let’s put Grey Wind’s height at 46 inches.

Next up was a question for Rolf Peterson, a research professor at Michigan Technological University who has studied wolf-prey relationships at Isle Royale National Park for more than 40 years. He told me that if we’re assuming a dire wolf is approximately 150 percent bigger than a regular wolf (which it would be at the height we’ve estimated), he would approximate its food needs at 25 deer per year. The average weight of a white-tailed deer, according to the Adirondack Ecological Center, is 203 pounds.

OK, now to convert deer to dragons.

To do so, I looked to the bird kingdom. I know I could have used something more reptilian, but considering that dragons have to be able to fly, I thought a bird was a better analogy. Plus, birds are relatives of dinosaurs and all that, so there you go. (See, very scientific). I went with the Andean condor, one of the largest flying birds in the world. I could have chosen the wandering albatross (also a big bird), but the condor just looks a little more badass, it can live up to 100 years, and likes cliffs. All dragon-like qualities if you ask me. Plus, it’s a heavy sucker — the adults weigh up to 33 pounds, according to National Geographic.

So let’s say that at the end of the third season, the khaleesi’s dragons are about the size of a full-grown condor, with 10-foot wingspans. It kind of looks right based on the above screen grab from the epic scene in which the khaleesi unleashes her beast (and her completely captivating knowledge of Valyrian).

That would mean there are about 6 dragons to one deer. If a dire wolf eats 25 deer per year, that results in an annual adolescent dragon dietary need of 150, or almost three of the flying lizards per week. I’m not sure which variety the wolves would prefer, but I’d go for the red ones as I tend to like spicy food. Of course, there’s the question of a dire wolf even catching a dragon (and the fact that the Targaryen dragons are going to get just a little bit bigger), but I’ll leave those investigations to a researcher wiser than me.

Now that that’s settled, you can pay tribute by leaving your undying thanks for solving such a critical and nagging riddle related to “Game of Thrones” in the comments below. I promise not to get a Joffrey-like swelled head.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/SuuoThCxu1U/

How many of the khaleesi’s dragons could a dire wolf eat?

Definitely cooler than a condor, Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons would nonetheless taste pretty good to a dire wolf.


(Credit:
Video screenshot by Michael Franco/CNET)

Possible spoilers ahead if you’re not through with the third season: With the fourth season of “Game of Thrones” imminent, there are a lot of questions in the air (especially if, like me, you haven’t read the books). Will the khaleesi finally make it to Westeros to capture the Iron Throne? Will the Starks in the diaspora ever find each other again? Will winter ever actually come? And will someone finally beat the royal stuffing out of Joffrey?

But I’ve been giving thought to a particularly pesky question that I’m sure hordes of fans are dying to know. (OK, probably not, but it’s certainly a question that’s crossed my random-factoid-focused science brain). It began when I started thinking about what would happen if Robb Stark ever met up with Daenerys Targaryen (which of course, can never happen now with Robb being all dead and whatnot). While some might think my ponderings might have turned to the beautiful offspring that surely would have resulted if those two ever got together, I had a much different question in mind: How many Targaryen dragons could a Stark dire wolf eat per year if it got its fangs on them? To find out, I embarked on some very scientific research.

dire wolf

Robb Stark with his dire wolf Grey Wind. Looks hungry, doesn’t it?


(Credit:
Video screenshot by Michael Franco/CNET)

To begin my investigation, I grabbed the screenshot you see to the right from a YouTube clip featuring Robb Stark. In this particular scene, he’s got his dire wolf, Grey Wind, next to him in an effort to scare the piss out of Jaime Lannister. (If you ask me, it worked. But I digress.) Robb Stark is played by actor Richard Madden, who, I found out thanks to a quick Google search, is 5 feet 11 inches tall.

To determine the actor’s approximate inseam height, I reached out to Max Berlinger, a men’s fashion writer for Esquire magazine. “Honestly, I have no way to gauge this. I wish I could be more helpful, but this is a puzzle,” Berlinger said. However, he did say that if he had to make a guess — and a guess only — he’d put it at 32 inches, which is pretty standard for a man of Madden’s size. Because I am the same height as Madden (and share a certain rugged set of good looks as him, but I again I digress), and have a 32-inch inseam, I went with that. Science at its best.

So if Robb Stark’s inseam is 32 inches and the wolf is standing about a foot above that, let’s put Grey Wind’s height at 46 inches.

Next up was a question for Rolf Peterson, a research professor at Michigan Technological University who has studied wolf-prey relationships at Isle Royale National Park for more than 40 years. He told me that if we’re assuming a dire wolf is approximately 150 percent bigger than a regular wolf (which it would be at the height we’ve estimated), he would approximate its food needs at 25 deer per year. The average weight of a white-tailed deer, according to the Adirondack Ecological Center, is 203 pounds.

OK, now to convert deer to dragons.

To do so, I looked to the bird kingdom. I know I could have used something more reptilian, but considering that dragons have to be able to fly, I thought a bird was a better analogy. Plus, birds are relatives of dinosaurs and all that, so there you go. (See, very scientific). I went with the Andean condor, one of the largest flying birds in the world. I could have chosen the wandering albatross (also a big bird), but the condor just looks a little more badass, it can live up to 100 years, and likes cliffs. All dragon-like qualities if you ask me. Plus, it’s a heavy sucker — the adults weigh up to 33 pounds, according to National Geographic.

So let’s say that at the end of the third season, the khaleesi’s dragons are about the size of a full-grown condor, with 10-foot wingspans. It kind of looks right based on the above screen grab from the epic scene in which the khaleesi unleashes her beast (and her completely captivating knowledge of Valyrian).

That would mean there are about 7 dragons to one deer. If a dire wolf eats 25 deer per year, that results in an annual adolescent dragon dietary need of 175, or about three and a quarter of the flying lizards per week. I’m not sure which variety the wolves would prefer, but I’d go for the red ones as I tend to like spicy food. Of course, there’s the question of a dire wolf even catching a dragon (and the fact that the Targaryen dragons are going to get just a little bit bigger), but I’ll leave those investigations to a researcher wiser than me.

Now that that’s settled, you can pay tribute by leaving your undying thanks for solving such a critical and nagging riddle related to “Game of Thrones” in the comments below. I promise not to get a Joffrey-like swelled head.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/biTlYHaY-2g/

Friday Poll: What will the Web be like in 25 more years?

Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the Web, created a powerful entity.


(Credit:
World Wide Web Consortium)

The Web turned 25 this week and the birthday celebrations have been full of memories and musings. Crave’s Eric Mack put together a four-part series tracing his life through the Web, from his days as a teenage dial-up addict, through the dot-com boom and bust, to how the Web looks today.

It’s been a wild ride so far, but where will the roller coaster take us next? There’s been plenty of speculation on the future of the Web. Even though “Minority Report” came out back in 2002, it’s still mentioned constantly as a model for immersive interactions with computers. Perhaps we’ll all be flailing our hands about in the air as we interface with a Web that has pretty much the whole world under surveillance.

There is already plenty of talk about the “Internet of Things,” so it’s not hard to imagine the Web growing into a giant network of stuff, connecting everything from dog collars to toasters to sensor-laden bracelets worn on our wrists.

Perhaps the Web will take a darker turn, one where some governments attempt to exercise more control over what citizens can access, fracturing the borderless ideal of the Internet.

Chances are, the Web in 25 years could be a mix of all these things, along with developments we haven’t even imagined yet. If you had told a Web user back in the early ’90s that we would all be storing our data in the cloud and people would be walking around with the Internet on their glasses, you might be accused of writing a sci-fi story.

Take what you know about the history of the Web and turn your imagination loose. What will the Web look like 25 years from now? Vote in our poll, and share your vision in the comments.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/X3WwvojSzss/

Crave giveaway: $500 shopping spree from Rakuten.com Shopping


Hmmm, so many choices… (Click to enlarge.)


(Credit:
Screenshot by Leslie Katz/CNET)

Readers have loved past shopping sprees at Rakuten.com Shopping, so we’re back with another one, and it’s big-ticket.

This week’s winner gets a $500 gift certificate from the massive online retailer, which sells everything from consumer electronics to furniture, clothes, shoes, jewelry, toys, sports gear, and well, more stuff upon stuff. Yep, $500. And next week marks a great time to go all consumer-crazy up on Rakuten.com Shopping, since it will hold a big sale, with goods up to 70 percent off sitewide.

So how do you go about scoring a $500 blank check from Rakuten.com Shopping (formerly Buy.com)? There are a few rules, so please read carefully before you start composing your shopping list.

  • Register as a CNET user. Go to the top of this page and hit the “Join CNET” link to start the registration process. If you’re already registered, there’s no need to register again.
  • Leave a comment below. You can leave whatever comment you want. If it’s funny or insightful, it won’t help you win, but we’re trying to have fun here, so anything entertaining is appreciated.
  • Leave only one comment. You may enter for this specific giveaway only once. If you enter more than one comment, you will be automatically disqualified.
  • The winner will be chosen randomly. The winner will receive one (1) gift certificate from Rakuten.com Shopping, with a retail value of $500.
  • If you are chosen, you will be notified via email. The winner must respond within three days of the end of the sweepstakes. If you do not respond within that period, another winner will be chosen.
  • Entries can be submitted until 12 p.m. ET on Monday, March 17.

And here’s the disclaimer that our legal department said we had to include (sorry for the caps, but rules are rules):

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. YOU HAVE NOT YET WON. MUST BE LEGAL RESIDENT OF ONE OF THE 50 UNITED STATES OR D.C., 18 YEARS OLD OR AGE OF MAJORITY, WHICHEVER IS OLDER IN YOUR STATE OF RESIDENCE AT DATE OF ENTRY INTO SWEEPSTAKES. VOID IN PUERTO RICO, ALL U.S. TERRITORIES AND POSSESSIONS, AND WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. Sweepstakes ends at 12 p.m. ET on Monday, March 17, 2014. See official rules for details.

Good luck.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/_u0LJ0SxSTo/

Kaiju monsters go high-fashion for ‘ultra’ shopping center debut

Mother of Ultra is makes even the tallest supermodel look short in this latest ad campaign to promote the newly renovated Amu Plaza Hakata in Japan.

Mother of Ultra makes even the tallest supermodel look short in the latest ad campaign to promote the newly renovated Amu Plaza Hakata in Japan.


(Credit:
Tsuburaya Productions)

The ultimate superheroine Mother of Ultra is the perfect supermodel for an ad campaign to celebrate the “ultra renewal” of 97 stores in the Amu Plaza Hakata shopping center in Japan.

Mother of Ultra, as well as kaiju monsters Alien Baltan, Dada, and Pigumon strut their stuff on the catwalk. In other videos, Mother of Ultra invades the city of Fukuoka itself, modeling the latest fashions most likely found in the newly updated shopping center.

While this is only an ad campaign, it would make an amazing monster movie with some of the most iconic “Ultraman” characters turning fashion victims into ultra fashionistas.

Here’s hoping other kaiju characters follow in their fashionable footsteps. If anyone can rock a Spencer Hart suit, it’d be Godzilla.

(Via Kotaku)

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/Iu-tbZ5iypg/

Here’s what Mars looks like during its spring thaw

Mars in spring

The dark spots are south-facing slopes.


(Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona)

If you want to get in some snowboarding on Mars, you had better hurry up and get over there. The planet is already busy thawing out for springtime. NASA released an image taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in mid-January showing sand dunes from the northernmost reaches of Mars as they begin to shed their winter coats.

Instead of snow, the dunes are covered with carbon dioxide ice, better known on Earth as “dry ice,” the stuff you throw in a punch bowl for a Halloween party.

In the photo, the white parts are the dry ice coverage and the large dark swathes are the south-facing slopes that are getting warmed up by the sun. It’s not much different than what happens on our planet when the seasons change. Mars is, however, spared the oncoming blast of spring allergy season.

The dunes can be fairly steep, causing sand to slide down and further clear off spots of dry ice. Any aliens on the surface won’t be breaking out the swimsuits and pina coladas, though. The average temperature on Mars is still well below freezing. Keep that in mind when you’re planning your next interplanetary spring break trip.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/pRza/~3/52E8J1gyRtM/

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Func HS-260 Review

Func HS-260 Review

Manufacturer: Func
UK Price: (as reviewed): £69.98
US Price: (as reviewed): $79.99

Func is steadily making a name for itself with a stream of decent quality peripherals including the Func MS-3 mouse and of course its mousemats – the products the Func name was known for before the brand was bought. The latest addition to this lineup is the Func HS-260 headset. It retails for around £60 and includes a surprising number of potentially useful features that mark it out at its price point.

Func HS-260 ReviewFunc HS-260 Review
First things first, this is a large, circumaural headset which isn’t designed to fold flat so is more of a stay at home model than one to take on your travels to LAN parties. That said, like the QPad 90 and Sennhesier G4ME Zero it uses a closed-back headphone design so does block out a bit of background noise.

Build quality of the HS-260 is okay with the headset certainly looking the part; the combination of matt black and silver with a few chrome highlights works very well. It also stood up to a fair amount of tortuous twisting during our testing. However it is all plastic and there is a slightly rattlely and squeaky quality to the headband and earcup joints. It’s minor stuff but does again highlight the quality of the two aforementioned headsets, which are notably more expensive it must be said.

Func HS-260 Review
The first real standout feature of this headset is its inclusion of a clever detachable microphone and cable system. We say system because the two are interchangeable. On each earcup there is a hole into which either the microphone or main cable can be inserted. Both use standard 3.5mm jack plugs (4-pole rather than stereo) but via the use of magic the headset knows which is which.

Func HS-260 Review
It’s a brilliant system that allows you to choose which side the cable and microphone go and, like any removable cable system, means that you can replace the cable. We don’t suppose it will be all that easy to get official replacements for but at least with the headphone cable you can easily replace it with any standard cable that has a narrow enough plastic surround to the plug.

Incorporated into the microphone is a mute switch. This is very convenient and falls perfectly to hand, though the little slider switch is a bit stiff. The microphone itself is also mounted on a fully flexible arm, which we found was perfect for easily positioning the microphone exactly where we wanted.

The cable itself is a plentiful 3 metres long and comes out of the box impressively free of kinks. It’s braided along its full length and terminates in two standard 3.5mm jacks for the microphone and headphone portions of the headset. As we’d expect in this day and age the ring spacers between the poles are colour coded so it’s easy to tell which is which.

Func HS-260 Review
Just to the rear of the cable socket on the left earcup there is also an integrated volume control. This is not as easy to find in the heat of battle as we’d like, with its slim profile and small diameter meaning you have to rummage around for it a little. It’s also quite sensitive, making fine adjustment a little difficult. All told it’s definitely more convenient than none at all or an inline control but isn’t quite up there with the best on-headset or desktop controls. As this is a passive headset the control simply attenuates the signal it is fed.

Func HS-260 Review
As well as offering a choice in cable setup the HS-260 also has a choice of earcup pads. Out of the box they have a plush velvet finish but included in the box is a set of pleather pads. Replacing them is a very simple affair, with the whole pad twisting off and the new pad sliding on.

Specifications:

  • Colour Black with orange highlights
  • Wearing style Headband
  • Ear coupling Closed back, supra-aural
  • Frequency response (headphones) 20 – 20,000Hz
  • Impedance Headphones: 32 Ω
  • Drivers 50mm
  • Connector 2 x 3.5 mm
  • Cable length 3m
  • Dimensions 180x105x194
  • Weight 370g

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bit-tech/hardware/~3/oIIwb-NeoWI/1

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